No Child Left Behind And The Common Core State Standards

885 words - 4 pages

The main goal of both No Child Left Behind and the Common Core State Standards are to have students perform better primary in Language Arts and Mathematics, though the Common Core State Standards does branch out into other subjects, like Science. With No Child Left Behind, there is a focus on testing on Language Arts and Mathematics and schools that do not improve would face sanctions. With the Common Core State Standards, there is still a focus on testing primary in Language Arts and Mathematics and a very detailed map on how to teach the subjects, there is also some guidance in teaching other subjects, like Science. Schools and teachers need to try use the new standards and try to cater to the needs of their students as much as possible, though the teachers might not always be able to do this. Both No Child Left Behind and the Common Core State Standards are not easy to implement, but a teacher has to do what they can to help their students face these new standards.
In No Child Left Behind, students are tested every year from third to eighth grade and once in high school in the subjects on Language Arts and Mathematics. These test scores are broken down into groups, like race and income status. Those schools that do not make adequate progress in each group face sanctions and repeated failings could force the school to allow students to transfer, provide free tutoring, or even school restructuring or closing. The goal with No Child Left Behind is to have every child proficient in Language Arts and Mathematics fix schools that are not able to perform at these levels. The problem with No Child Left Behind is that everything is based on these tests scores and the tests focuses on just Language Arts and Mathematics. As Ravitch has pointed out in the book, if everything rides on the test scores, then the teachers will have to do what it takes to raise those test scores, even if it means sacrificing other subjects, like Science and History. The teachers are forced to teach to the tests and the students learn how to take the tests and not necessary the knowledge they need.
The Common Core State Standards also has a focus on testing Language Arts and Mathematics, but it does try to branch out into other subjects, like Science. There is still a heavy dependence on standardized tests in this new system and it will take some time for everyone to adjust to these new standards. With the Common Core State Standards, there is also a set of guidelines for the curriculum and a focus on making...

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