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Normalcy And The New Deal And The New Deal

819 words - 4 pages

Sounte,

As they say, normal it is all relative. What is normal to one culture may be taboo to another. During the 1920s the population increased at record numbers, and movie theaters brought in a new form of self-expression; and with this newly found self-expression, came a counter culture. This counter culture was more open-minded than previous generations, and that was reflected in the way they dressed. Conservative Catholics in the Catholic Legion of Decency did not like the escapism that went along with these movie palaces, nor did they like sex and violence in these movies; so they vowed to put limitations on the subject matter and the content of films with the creation of the Production Code Administration (PCA) also known as the Hayes Office (Bowles, 2011). Then, in 1930, “the government established a series of production codes” that would not allow films to be released unless they met these specific criteria; such as the restriction of images that conveyed sex perversion, incest, interracial sex, abortion, and drugs, or even anything that suggested impropriety. Certain types of dialogue (such as profane language, anti-democratic, and pro-communist messages) were also banned. “The goal was to strengthen America itself in a time of economic crisis by ensuring that the millions of people attending movie houses were seeing morally wholesome messages” (Bowles, 2011, 3.5). The PCA, the government, and the Catholic Legion of Decency believed that while the country was in financial peril, it was also in moral peril, and they did not want the country's values to be in jeopardy of eroding during this vulnerable time, as well. The codes were enforced starting in 1934.

In other news, Progressives aimed to assist the elderly, and the handicapped through reform policies. But there were people who did not support the second New Deal (at least not from the get-go), citing that “it went against the founding philosophy of the United States itself because it did not support self-reliance” (Bowles, 2011, 3.2). But once the country delved deeper into the depression, “people realized that the traditional forms of societal support (charity, family, and paid labor) were insufficient” (Bowles, 2011, 3.2). Enacted in 1935, the Preamble of the Social Security Act stated that it was: An act to provide for the general welfare by establishing a system of Federal old-age benefits, and by enabling the several States to make more...

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