This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

"Normative Ethical Subjectivism" And The Four Arguments Aganist It With Examples

1421 words - 6 pages

Normative ethical subjectivism is an ethical stance that attempts to specify circumstances under which an action is morally right or wrong using four distinct arguments that try to prove this claim. Normative ethical subjectivism claims that an act is morally right if, and only if, the person judging the action approves of it. Stemming form this view on ethics a normative ethical theory has been made. An ethical theory is a theory of what is right and wrong. This stance on ethics is the opposite of another ethical stance called methethical antirealism. Methethical antirealism is centered on the idea that because there is no right and wrong actions, just personal preferences there is no such thing as morality. It also states that morals are just a personal preference. Normative ethical subjectivism makes its claim in four different arguments witch are democracy, tolerance, disagreement and atheism.The democracy argument makes the premise that if everyone has an equal right to have and voice moral opinions then everyone's moral opinions are equally plausible. The next premise states that everyone does have an equal right to have and voice moral opinions. These two premises lead to the conclusion that everyone's moral opinions are equally plausible. The first premise of the argument creates a problem because not everyone's moral opinions are equally valid and plausible. I have lots of opinions like the location of LSU, how far away the moon is and, the speed limit on College Drive. My opinion is LSU is located in Arizona, the moon is 100 miles away and the speed limit on College Drive is 75 miles per hour. My opinions are all incorrect showing that the plausibility of an opinion really has nothing to do with one's right to hold it. Having a right to an opinion is one thing, the truth of that opinion quite another. This undermines the first premise of the argument causing me to reject a crucial part of the democracy argument. Consequently making the argument for democracy unstable and not a good foundation for supporting normative ethical subjectivism.The next argument for normative ethical subjectivism is the argument of disagreement. The first premise states that if there is a constant disagreement among educated, open-minded and, good-willed people about some subject matter, then that subject matter does not admit to an objective truth. Followed by the premise there is persistent disagreement about ethical issues among educated, open-minded and, good-willed people. These two statements lead to the conclusion that there are no objective ethical truths. There is persistent disagreement among educated, open-minded and, good-willed physicists and mathematicians. We assume that their work is aimed at discovering objective facts. Physicists continue to disagree about that started the universe. But this is not evidence that their views are subjective, it is evidence that the facts they arrive at are merely expressions of personal opinion about some fact....

Find Another Essay On "Normative ethical subjectivism" and the four arguments aganist it with examples

Describe, with examples if possible, the four orientations of criticism found in the first chapter of M. H. Abrams 'The Mirror and the Lamp'

1099 words - 4 pages his principle categories for defining, classifying and analyzing a work of art, as well as the major criteria by which he judges it value. The four critical theories of orientation that Abrams relates them to are mimetic, pragmatic, expressive and objective and I will start by describing mimetic.Mimetic theories explore art as imitations of the universe. From the days of Plato and beyond mimetic orientations operated with three categories; that of

Explain briefly with examples on the three theories in motivation and how it applies to business organisation today

1274 words - 5 pages of work in line with their motivational impact to both the mangers and employees. We can apply this need within the organization for instance Provide lunch breaks, rest breaks, and wages that are sufficient to purchase the essentials of life.Secondly; the safety need that will employ the security one gets from the job, for all possible safety issues be it physical or emotional harm. For example provide a safe working environment, freedom from

Explain briefly with examples on the three theories in motivation and how it applies to business organisation today

1274 words - 5 pages of work in line with their motivational impact to both the mangers and employees. We can apply this need within the organization for instance Provide lunch breaks, rest breaks, and wages that are sufficient to purchase the essentials of life.Secondly; the safety need that will employ the security one gets from the job, for all possible safety issues be it physical or emotional harm. For example provide a safe working environment, freedom from

Mutual assured destruction and the ethical dilemmas that come with it

1285 words - 5 pages possibility of a real exchange of nuclear weapons and in their terms would say that a country which came out of a nuclear war with more (however little) of its society intact could somehow be considered the winner. The next question is clearly more difficult. Can it be right to threaten to commit evil if somehow that threat can prevent the evil threatened from coming about? This is the question at the heart of deterrence and which I have grappled

The Westboro Baptist Church and Their Ideologies Aganist Homosexuals

1263 words - 6 pages shows their condemnation of homosexuals through picketing. They stand in the public eye with signs that states, “God hates Fags” or “Thank God for IED” (ADL 1). This is non-violent because they do not get in physical altercations with other civilians nor authoritative figures such as police. Their movement can be considered disobedient because although it is lawful to picket, you can accuse them of disturbing the peace and violating peoples’ privacy

Television and Media Essay - Four Arguments for the Elimination of TV

2890 words - 12 pages Four Arguments for the Elimination of Television   Television technology has been a controversial issue since its debut in the early 1940s. In order to fully understand any controversial issue, one must be presented with both the pro and the con sides of the issue. One must understand and be able to argue both sides of the issue in order to become a successful and well-educated person. Being a member of the pro-technological

Using Four Arguments to Have Full Knowledge - Plato’s Cave and the Divided Lines

2190 words - 9 pages Using Four Arguments to Have Full Knowledge - Plato’s Cave and the Divided Lines People must learn the value of life and the difference between living a dream and making your dreams come true. Being considered a father in western philosophy, Plato presented the Divided Line and Plato’s Cave to show the differences between the intelligent and visible world people live in; as the visible world being a world of one’s own reflections and

It is said that Japanese culture is both delicate and fierce; defend this viewpoint with examples

846 words - 3 pages art and beauty in action.Throughout Japan you see examples of beauty. The Zen Rock Garden at first looks to be a very cold and uninviting place. It is nothing more than a couple of large rocks placed in an oversized sandbox. There is no beauty to be seen it. It seems to typify the cold and hard nature of the Japanese culture, however, it has a deeper meaning. The Zen garden usually represents a larger image or concept, most likely representative

Ethical Dilemmas : Examples During the Holocaust

1040 words - 5 pages inhumane death that the Nazis were going to deliver upon them (Nevins). This medical student decided to fight back against what the Nazi Party had in store for them. He killed many people to protect them, regardles of the consequences that would later be in store. This was an ethical dilemma with a difficult decision to make, let the Jews be tortured, starved, or shot by the Nazis or end their suffering and risk ones own death. It was a generosity to

Positive Arguments for Euthanasia: Touching on ethical views and the views of terminally ill patients

514 words - 2 pages positive role of euthanasia by explaining why it is that terminally ill patients consider euthanasia an option and what the ethical views concerning this issue are.The main reason for which people consider ending their life through euthanasia is because they are terminally ill. Terminally ill patients are those who have been diagnosed with a progressive degenerative disease for which there is not a known cure. These diseases include those such as

Gay Marriage Why It Should Be Legal, And The Arguments Against It

1597 words - 6 pages Gay MarriageWhy It Should Be Legal, And The Arguments Against ItThey say that America is the land of the free; the freedom to privacy, the freedom of speech, and especially the freedom of religion. In today's society, homosexuality is everywhere you go. You can find it in books, in the media, and especially on the television. Homosexuality is quickly being the norm of today's world. Obviously there has been a much greater acceptance towards

Similar Essays

Four Normative Theories Which Help Guide Ethical Decision Making

2308 words - 9 pages Ethics permeates all aspects of society, both on an individual and societal level for it involves human interaction. The ethical decision-making models, like humans – are complex and do not exist in isolation, thus finding a set of uniform ethical values and standards in a multicultural society is highly challenging. This essay will briefly overview four Normative theories which help guide ethical decision making, regarding the hypothetical

Ethical Dilemmas And Normative Theories Essay

1618 words - 7 pages this situation. After analysing the case study and doing my research on ethical normative theories and morals in business, my opinion would be for John not to take the risk and do what is 'right' and wait until the deal goes through before signing off on the order. Yes the company may not make it through but John will still be able to find another job where as if he commits fraud things may be a lot worse for him in the long run. In the end he will have made the right decision not breaking the company’s laws and regulations.

Evidence And Examples Of The Four Learning Outcomes

2846 words - 12 pages ENG 3010 is an intermediate writing course that prepares students for reading, research, and writing. Students develop writing skills in their own discipline or professional communities by analyzing texts, evidence and writing conventions (Bell, 2014). Four course learning objectives provide a foundation in which by the end of the semester a final research paper is produced with a narrowed definitive focus on a particular subject. Each

Cameras In The Court: Is It Really Aganist Our Rights?

632 words - 3 pages ruling conflicts with an official court’s ruling on a case. Courts have acquitted people of the crimes there were accused of even though most of the world believed they were guilty of their respective crimes; two of the most infamous examples are George Zimmerman and Casey Anthony. Most of the public thought and still thinks that Zimmerman and Anthony are guilty of the crimes they may or may not have committed and because of that fact, Zimmerman