Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (Ocd) Essay

2741 words - 11 pages

The human brain is a very powerful piece of structure; it is truly limitless when speaking about its potential. With a functional organ comes a dysfunctional possibility. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, (OCD), for instance, is nervousness in the mind. OCD is an anxiety disorder caused by repetitive intrusive thoughts and behaviors. It is a mental disorder marked by the involvement of a devotion to an idea or routine. Essentially, it is a false core belief which is believing that there is something wrong, causing the mind to overpower the body in order to better itself. The act, the compulsion, is performed in order to reduce the amount of anxiety the host experiences in his thoughts, the obsession. Obsessive Compulsive Disorders can be anything from excessively washing your hands, not stepping on cracks, and even excessively having your possessions clean such as your house, office, car, etc. These compulsions can be treated to an extent. Through observations, it is simple to conclude that everyone has a form of an obsession, very much like OCD, that can benefit bright and new concepts throughout the world.
According to the history books, the anxiety disorder of OCD is said to originate in Europe during the 14th and 16th century. During that time, it was believed that people who experienced and had obsessive thoughts, specifically sexual, were possessed by the Devil. Exorcism was the treatment used for people of this manner to “cure” them. Nevertheless, in the early 1910s, Austrian born neurologist Sigmund Freud, who was the founder of psychoanalysis, attributed obsessive- compulsive behavior to unconscious conflicts that manifest as symptoms. He believed that in early childhood life, humans have and attain a “touching phobia”. Contributing to this disorder, Freud explains throughout his work, that the human mind has strong desires. With these desires occur an “external prohibition” against the desires. However, the desire is never diminished it simply forces itself to the unconscious mind. Essentially, the human mind is capable of reaching immense heights due to its desires and it is almost impossible to avoid such feature.
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is the fourth most common mental disorder. Statistics show that “one in 50 adults” in the United States have OCD. People with OCD frequently seek the pleasure or relief of performing actions that are related to the anxiety. Additionally, they may recognize the thoughts and behaviors to be irrational; even so, it can be difficult for people to resist them and break free. In general, studies show that the average person with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder will develop this condition before the age of 25. Daily activities are altered. Behavior within a person with OCD includes: tardiness, perfectionism, procrastination, indecision, discouragement and family problems. Moreover, around 80% of all OCD sufferers are diagnosed with depression. Therefore, not only does man feel...

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