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Obsessive Love In Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald

950 words - 4 pages

In The Great Gatsby, Jay Gatsby is portrayed as a naive and heartbroken man who will do anything to revive his relationship with the love of his life; even if it means reliving the past. Gatsby is a victim to temptation, manipulation, society and obsessive love. However it is because of this obsessive and incessant love that the rest of his problems unfold. He is so blinded and determined to gain the approval of his former lover, he allows himself to be made a mockery by society.It is made clear that Gatsby moved to West Egg for the sole reason that the love of his life, Daisy Buchanan, lives with her husband Tom in a house within sight of Gatsby’s mansion. “I think he half expected her to wander into one of his parties, some night…but she never did” (Fitzgerald.4.84). As Daisy’s friend Jordan explains the situation to the narrator and Daisy’s cousin, Nick Carraway, she notes that although Gatsby threw countless parties that were no interest of him in hopes that Daisy would one day stumble in, she was clueless to how very close Jay Gatsby was to her. Gatsby lacked the courage to approach Daisy, even though he worked his life around his dream of seeing her again.Gatsby was referred to by the socialites as “new money.” Living in West Egg was less respectable then living in East Egg. The social structure was not of much concern to Gatsby and he paid little attention to etiquette or class. His obsession with Daisy took top priority, and while his intentions were sincere, Gatsby put himself in positions to be made a fool. “My God, I believe the man’s coming…Doesn’t he know she doesn’t want him?”(Fitzgerald.6.109). When invited by the Sloanes, a wealthy couple from East Egg, to eat dinner with them, Gatsby innocently accepts, not realizing it was merely a formality. His pure love for Daisy shows through in all aspects of his life, affecting his judgment and ability to see through those with less than genuine intentions.One of the main themes throughout The Great Gatsby is Gatsby’s attempt to turn back time and relive what he had in the past with Daisy. “Can’t repeat the past…why of course you can!”(Fitzgerald.6.116). It is clear that the relationship between Gatsby and Daisy remains only in the past, and it is apparent to all but the two that their relationship ended many years ago. Since the five years they last saw each other, Daisy moved on with her life; although neither she nor Gatsby are willing to admit to it.Gatsby’s love for Daisy affects every aspect of his life, and when he is finally able to reunite with her, it is hard to believe that nothing has changed in their relationship. “Almost five years! There must have been moments…when Daisy...

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