Occupational Essay

1749 words - 7 pages ✓ Expert Reviewed

Imagine a world where there are no occupations that are designed to make the lives of others better. Imagine a world where there is no one who is trained to assist individuals who are born with mental illnesses or any kind of developmental disorders. This is what the world would be like if there were not jobs in the occupational therapy field. Occupational Therapy was first documented in around 100 BCE when the Greek Physician Asclepiades devised to humanely treat patients with mental illnesses by giving them therapeutic baths, massages, music and exercise. It was then documented again during the peak times of the Roman Empire. Then throughout the Medieval Times these treatments were very rare almost to the point that they did not exist.
During the 1700's in Europe the hospital system was reformed, and the use of chains for restraining patients with mental illnesses were traded in for a more humane approach. The intuitions owned by Philippe Pinel and Johann Christian Reil opted for an approach in which the chains would not be used. This approach used activities in which exercise and leisure would both be taken advantage of and they would not have to restrain their patients. America started it's reformation in the early 20th century, in light of the Progressive Era although there had been numerous documentations of America doing things that would be considered the job of an occupational therapist the actual reformation started in light of the progressive era.
In this field there are many different professions that can be entered. Such as, but not limited to, Children, Health and Wellness, Mental Health, Rehabilitation and Work and Industry. There are many different occupations in each of these different categories. A job in occupational therapy tends to average anywhere from $43,851 to $98,832 per year, depending on the amount of time that they have been employed. You have the potential to start out anywhere from $43,851 to $70,000 as a first year therapist. Over the course of the career there are many opportunities to learn different things, to help many people and to meet new people. The longer that someone is employed in this field the more salary they are going to be receiving.
I personally believe that Occupational Therapy is one of the best job fields to go into and that everyone should consider it. There are many different reasons that could make someone interested in this field but the three main reasons that I have are there is no cure for people with disorders or learning advantages, which provides job security, helping others is one of the few things that provides a sense of having done a good deed, and lastly, because there are numerous subcategories in the Occupational Therapy field.
The Occupational Therapy field has numerous factors that makes people want to be employed in that field of work. There are many different benefits from working in this industry. One of these benefits is that there is no cure for most of the...

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