Oedipus: Destiny And Fate Essay

1452 words - 6 pages

Oedipus: Destiny and FateAlthough it is widely alleged that destiny is by choice, there are a vast number of people who believed that it is by fate. Those who believed it is by choice follow the directions and guidance of their elders. For example, they will try to hold on to the values that their parents instilled in them and use them to guide their entire lives. Others who believed that destiny is by fate, believe that the outcome of their lives is determined by luck, and that no matter what they do or how careful they are, whatever has to happen to them must happen. These proponents that emphasize that destiny is by fate may have gotten their belief from myth such as the story of Oedipus, which is a perfect illustration of how destiny is by fate. Just like most mythical stories, the characters in this story tried unsuccessfully to change fate to suit them. However, as you are about to see, fate cannot change. It can only be redirected, but will still eventually achieve its objective.At the beginning of the plot there were the king and queen of Thebes: Laius and Jocasta. It's been stated that Apollo told Laius that if he wanted to save his kingdom, he must die without offspring (Parada). Being as stubborn as all mythological figures do, he and his wife still wanted children. So they went to the Oracle of Delphi about their childlessness. It was prophesied that if he had son, the son would kill him and marry his mother. Laius didn't take this warning seriously, but when his son, Oedipus, was born, he knew he had to kill him (Fun Trivia). So he pinned his feet together and gave him to the shepherd to do his dirty work. The shepherd took pity on Oedipus (that's how he got his name, by his injury) and gave him to Polybus and Merope, king and queen of Corinth (Wikipedia). Thanks to the shepherd and the king and queen of Corinth, Oedipus is alive to fulfill the prophecy.Throughout his childhood to manhood, Oedipus started to inherit little pieces of his past. But when he tried to obtain more information, no one would say anything. So he went to the Oracle of Delphi. There he was informed of his fate in an unclear way. When Oedipus heard of this, he left Corinth to avoid killing his adoptive father who he believes is his real father. On his way to Thebes, he runs into this chariot. It just so happens that this chariot had his birth father in it, but both father and son didn't know nor recognize each other. They got into a heated fight because Laius ordered him out of the road. Oedipus thought of this demand as being an insult, and furthermore killed his father and his guards (Fun Trivia). As you can see, no matter how it's sought out, whether knowing consciously or not, fate is going to come true.According to the story, "Oedipus the King" (trans. By Stephen Berg), a famous part of Oedipus's life was when he came across the Sphinx at the cross roads that asks riddles to travelers. No one ever passed this intersection to or from Thebes because no one...

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