Of Miracles By David Hume Essay

975 words - 4 pages

"Of Miracles" by David Hume

In David Hume?s paper ?Of Miracles,? Hume presents a various number of arguments concerning why people ought not to believe in any miracles. Hume does not think that miracles do not exist it is just that we should not believe in them because they have no rational background. One of his arguments is just by definition miracles are unbelievable. And have no rational means in believing miracles. Another argument is that most miracles tend to come from uncivilized countries and the witnesses typically have conflicts of interest and counterdict each others experiences. Both of these arguments are valid however they tend to be weak. I think that Hume?s strongest argument is that he claims there is no credibility to the testimony behind the miracles.

In Hume?s argument he says ?that there is no testimony for any, even those which have not been expressly detected, that is not opposed by an infinite number of witnesses; so that not only the miracle destroys the credit of the testimony, but the testimony destroys itself.? To make this clear Hume uses religious matters. Many religions use miracles as a foundation. ?Every miracle, therefor, pretended to have been wrought in any of these religions as its direct scope is to establish the particular system to which it is attributed; so has it the same force, though bore indirectly, to overthrow every other system.? If the miracles try to destroy a system, a religion, it destroys the credit of the miracles themselves, and the system in which they were established. Since most religions are based on miracles and try to destroy each other with contrary miracles and then we as humans have no reasoning on which miracle to believe in. Therefore what I think that Hume is trying to say is that for a religion to be credible it must not be based on miracles. This argument is seen by society to be far fetched, because most people have a certain belief in a certain religion and have somewhat a belief in miracles, but Hume has a good argument. He says that people should not believe in religions that are based on miracles because they have no credibility. Miracles themselves are thought to have weak credibility because the majority of the people in the society think that they are false. However there are many people that believe in miracles in one way or another. Either directly or indirectly. If you affiliate yourself with a religion that is based on miracles then you are indirectly a believer in miracles. This is what Hume would think and also he would say that you should not believe in the miracles because they are the basis of your religion and have no credibility due...

Find Another Essay On Of Miracles by David Hume

Philosophy of David Hume Essay

2065 words - 8 pages Learning a lot this busy semester I have chosen to focus on David Hume and W.K. Clifford Theory. David Hume is a very famous philosopher for the methods that he takes to attack certain objects that he has a strong opinion on. He is the type of philosopher that will attack some of the simple things that we accept as humans and have grown to believe over time. First I’ll start off with David Hume and his outlook on Induction and generalization

Of the Standard of Taste by David Hume

1650 words - 7 pages practice can be addressed by better scheduling of time. A want in ability to make comparisons can be addressed by practice. A want in freedom of prejudice can be addressed by practice and good sense. And a want in good sense can be addressed by practice. Works Cited Hume, David. "Of the Standard of Taste." The Philosophy of Art: Readings Ancient and Modern. Eds. Neill, Alex and Aaron Ridley. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1995. 254-268. Print. Townsend, Dabney. Hume's aesthetic theory: taste and sentiment. New York: Routledge, 2001. Print.

The Bundle Theory by David Hume

1642 words - 7 pages organization of facts, our awareness of consciousness is a justified true belief, which makes it knowledge. An important idea in the counterclaim to holism, reductionism, is the bundle theory , which was originated by David Hume. This states that objects are defined by their properties and it is the properties that make the object; thus the object has no essence as it is just the sum of its parts and the properties are all that exist. If

Human Nature as Viewed by Thomas Hobbes and David Hume

2046 words - 8 pages Human Nature as Viewed by Thomas Hobbes and David Hume Thomas Hobbes in Chapter 13 of Leviathan, and David Hume in Section 3 of An Enquiry Concerning the Princples of Morals, give views of human nature. Hobbes’ view captures survivalism as significant in our nature but cannot account for altruism. We cover Hobbes’ theory with a theory of Varied Levels of Survivalism, explaining a larger body of behavior with the foundation Hobbes gives

David Hume's Argument Against Belief in the Existence of Miracles

2170 words - 9 pages David Hume was a British empiricist, meaning he believed all knowledge comes through the senses. He argued against the existence of innate ideas, stating that humans have knowledge only of things which they directly experience. These claims have a major impact on his argument against the existence of miracles, and in this essay I will explain and critically evaluate this argument. In his discussion 'Of Miracles' in Section X of An Enquiry

David Hume's critique of the belief in Miracles

1721 words - 7 pages In explaining Hume's critique of the belief in miracles,we must first understand the definition of a miracle. TheWebster Dictionary defines a miracle as: a supernatural eventregarded as to define action, one of the acts worked by Christwhich revealed his divinity an extremely remarkableachievement or event, an unexpected piece of luck. Therefore,a miracle is based on one's perception of past experiences,what everyone sees. It is based on a

A Treatise of Human Nature: David Hume´s Philosophy

932 words - 4 pages , convey to him these impressions; but proceed not so absurdly, as to endeavor to produce the impressions by exciting the ideas" (Pg. 9, Paragraph 8). This is reasonable, as none of us can truly envision a sour taste without first having experienced it via our sense of taste. The only possible contradiction to this that Hume can find is that of gradient colors. If presented with a progression of shades of blue, with one shade missing, it is not difficult for us to conjure the idea of this missing shade, even if we have never seen it before. Works Cited: Hume, David. A Treatise of Human Nature. (1739).

David Hume and Karl Marx’s Critiques of Religion

1287 words - 5 pages Where does religion come from? Many have tried to answer this question, only leaving us with more questions than answers. This essay will focus on two philosophers David Hume and Karl Marx both has strong critiques on the existence of God. Both going against the design argument, the design argument is the argument for the existence of God or single creator; however, with Hume’s empiricist and Marx's atheist they both attack the design argument

Negative Impact of God on the Minds of David Hume, Christopher Smart, and William Cowper

1679 words - 7 pages , and never can observe anything but the perception. When my perceptions are removed for any time, as by sound sleep, so long am I insensible of myself, and may truly be said not to exist. (Rossi 2645) Hume believes that existing is a state of mind, not necessarily a state of being. It is not until he is conscious of his perceptions that he believes he truly exists. Hume also wrote on the subject of miracles. Hume’s simple

Different Viewpoints of Empiricist Philosphers: John Locke, David Hume, George Berkley

2617 words - 11 pages Empiricists are philosophers who argue that knowledge comes from sensory experience. This means that whatever we experience through our senses are the only ideas that can be epistemically justified. John Locke, David Hume, and George Berkley are three of the most influential empiricists in modern philosophical history. Though sharing the same premise about knowledge stemming from sensory experience and having some common ground in certain areas

Comparing Thomas Reid and David Hume on the topic of the mind-body problem

851 words - 3 pages Is there an "I", or a "self"? What exactly does this "self" refer to? These are questions raised by personal identity that many philosophers have attempted to answer. Most people would probably believe that they have a self, but there are people and philosophers that think differently. One such philosopher opposed to the idea of a self is David Hume. On the other side of the argument, Thomas Reid, another philosopher, believed that there is

Similar Essays

David Hume On Miracles Essay

1326 words - 5 pages our beliefs. So what is Hume’s position on miracles? Hume first defines the term miracle as “a violation of the laws of nature” (Hume, 391). Laws of nature are established (according to Hume) by experiences. Because laws of nature are established by past experiences and miracles are violations of these laws, we can then conclude that miracles are violations of these experiences. However, though these laws are statements of past uniform

David Hume: On Miracles Essay

1897 words - 8 pages In explaining Hume’s critique of the belief in miracles, we must first understand the definition of a miracle. The Webster Dictionary defines a miracle as: a supernatural event regarded as to define action, one of the acts worked by Christ which revealed his divinity an extremely remarkable achievement or event, an unexpected piece of luck. Therefore, a miracle is based on one’s perception of past experiences, what everyone sees. It is based

David Hume On The Existence Of Miracles

1866 words - 8 pages In this paper I will look at David Hume’s (1711-1776) discussion from the An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, Section X, Of Miracles regarding whether it is a reasonable assumption to believe in the existence of miracles. I will first discuss why the existence of miracles matters and how miracles relate to our understanding of the laws of nature. Secondly, I will look at how Hume argues that it is never reasonable to believe in miracles

Analysis Of Suicide By David Hume

1259 words - 5 pages Analysis of Of Suicide by David Hume "I believe that no man ever threw away life, while it was worth keeping." In David Hume's essay "Of Suicide," the philosophical argument of justified suicide is pursued. However, the underlying argument focuses on the injustification of the government and society condemning and forbidding such an action and the creation of superstitions and falsehoods of religion and God. Hume argues that the last