Oil Boom In The Middle East

2090 words - 8 pages

At first sight, the viewer will notice the group of three men herding their camels in an environment which looks very hot and arid. By examining the three men more closely, the viewer will notice the style of clothing they are wearing. All three men in the picture are wearing some sort of head piece and a rob-like style of clothing which is similar to a dishdasha and a shalwar kameez that Muslim men wear. In the background of the picture, the viewer will notice a growing city with many infrastructures being built. There are also power lines going across the top of the picture as well all along the background near the city. The contrast between the old and the new is very evident in the picture; therefore, the viewer might conclude that the picture is saying that, regardless of modernizing the city, it still manages to keep the old traditions of the country intact. The city shown in the background of the photograph is Dubai, the second largest city in the state of United Arabs Emirates. However, one may be wondering, how a city came to be in that desert environment. The answer is in the natural resources the country has. The oil boom in the Middle East has led to great economic growth making some Arabian nations to become more westernized and industrialized. The economic and technological development since the twentieth century has been fuelled mainly by oil, just as the early industrial revolution of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries has been fuelled by coal. With the growing demand for oil in our fast paced world, the discovery of oil in United Emirates Arab and in other Middle Eastern states definitely sparked a new generation of wealth and prosperity. The Middle East “which happens to possess over 66% of the world’s [oil] reserves,” has been catapulted into the geopolitical limelight thus bringing in tens of trillions of dollars in revenues to the nations that possess it. In about the time span of only two decades, the United Arab Emirates, which before had little but sand and tiny merchant communities, became a sprawling and prosperous country all because of the oil that they had. The United Arab Emirates is a young country with a rich and diverse heritage incorporated in a modern cosmopolitan culture. And as shown in the photograph, the city is a city of contrast where the best of the new and the old, traditional and modern, blend seamlessly to produce a fascinating and exciting place with a distinct personality of its own. Referring back to the photograph, the men herding their camels symbolizes the old tradition of the country while the city in the background symbolizes the new and modern side of the country. One may be wondering why the men are riding camels...

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