One Child Policy Essay

2020 words - 8 pages

According to worldpopulationreview.com, China accounts for 19.3% of the world’s population currently, being the country with the largest population in the world of about 1,384,694,199 since the beginning of 2014. When The People’s Republic of China was formed in 1949, government officials and leaders analyzed current and future economic problems. They identified the population as one of them. In 1957, Mao proposed the idea of birth control and in 1979, the One Child Policy was officially implemented. With an increasing population and limited resources, China cannot afford to have more and more people. “It’s a very natural thing, like eating and drinking. It’s not against the law. And it’s quite safe to have an abortion.” says an anonymous Chinese woman on the policy. Though others don’t support the idea, the One Child Policy cannot be demolished as China will fall into the hands of chaos and more citizens will be in the wraths of poverty. Therefore, the One Child Policy should still exist in order for China to sustain itself.
Since China has about 1.3 billion people and the population continues to grow, there needs to be a plentiful amount of resources, such as food. According to the CIA world fact book, China also has the 163rd highest birth rate at 12.17 babies per 100 people, therefore there are roughly 16,851,738 babies born everyday in China. The birthrate is also higher than the death rate at 7.14 since 2011, meaning even more people. And all these people need resources such as food and water. On average, urban Chinese consumers spend 36% of their money on food and there are 300 million farmers in China. According to the Chinese government, China also ranks first in worldwide farm output. Though it ranks first, there is always a limit to how much one can produce. China also produces food for 20% of the worlds population, so if there are more people, it is still harder to support. And according to recent reports, 4,000 villages across China have been turned into desert and more than 200 million people are suffering from the effects of desertification. 13.4% of the Chinese population are already below the poverty line. If the One Child Policy is demolished then there will be an outcry for even more resources, leaving more to suffer. According to Liu Shao Jie, the vice director of the Population Commission in Henan, “The large number of people has put very big pressure on all resources, especially water”. The need for resources induces China to have the pressure of continually expanding for even more resources. China is already not following the international law by claiming waters up to the Philippines. Due to the expansion, China is almost at war with India and expecting war with Japan. Having the One Child Policy existing means that there will be less to provide for, leaving enough resources for people to survive as well as less pressure on china and less conflicts.
For China to continue to sustain itself, it also needs enough money. The...

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