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Open Up And Bleed, By Paul Trynka, Lullaby, By Chuck Palahniuk, And The Catcher In The Rye, By J.D. Salinger

1257 words - 5 pages

In my time as a student, I have come across a myriad of novels, short stories, novella, articles, and the like. Written works are really hard to avoid in life, especially as a teenager in high school. Needless to say, it's hard not to form an opinion on such works. I have come to find many titles that I admire, both fictitious and non, such as Open Up and Bleed by Paul Trynka. There are many more pieces of writing that I merely tolerated, Chuck Palahniuk's Lullaby was surely not the greatest work that my favorite author produced. Of course, I wouldn't be honest if I didn't admit that there were some works that I have come to know and loathe, one of which is Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger. All three of these works are the way that I have come to rate books to my peers. In all seriousness, I have all books that I can remember based on a scale of Catcher in the Rye to Open Up and Bleed.

Open Up and Bleed by Paul Trynka is one of the most fascinating books that I've ever managed to get my hands on. Trynka masterfully manages to show the many crests and troughs Iggy Pop undergoes throughout his life and career. It follows the brightest boy in school, a child so bright that his teachers and fellow classmates believed he'd be the president of the United States one day. As his life progresses, he chooses to pursue music instead. Trynka shows a life that almost seems fictional. This story has everything from a man's struggle with drug abuse, to the “sex, drugs, and rock'n'roll” mentality that took Iggy's generation by storm. This is truly the ultimate tale of creation out of destruction, and of redemption. I feel that if I were given the option of emulating any author's style, it would certainly be that of Paul Trynka, who managed to turn a concert into a battlefield, and managed to separate Iggy Pop the legend from Iggy Pop the man. I've read a lot of interesting fiction, and a lot of biographies, but I have to say that the most extraordinary literary work that I've ever come across is more enticing than the most incredible work of fiction, and one of the most thrilling musical biographies out there.

Interestingly enough, the most average book that I've managed to come across was written by my favorite author. Chuck Palahniuk, author of Fight Club, Invisible Monsters, and many more novels, was certainly not doing his best when he created the novel Lullaby. I'm truthfully not sure whether or not I only find this novel okay because I love the author so much or not. It could actually be awful. I could just be blinded by the admiration I have for Palahniuk. I wish I knew for certain, but what I do know is that Lullaby was one of the few works that I've read by the cult author that I did not fall in love with. The story follows a reporter who is assigned to investigate cases of crib death for a story that he's working. The reporter finds out that the reason babies are mysteriously dying is that they were all read the same lullaby before going to...

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