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Optimism And Pessimism In Les Miserables

622 words - 2 pages

Optimism and Pessimism in Les Miserables "Even the darkest night will end and the sun will rise" Optimism and pessimism show up frequently in Les Miserables by Victor Hugo, especially in the well-defined characters. The first minor character that has one of these qualities is the optimistic bishop who takes Jean Valjean in. Jean Valjean himself starts the story off as a pessimist but quickly becomes a very optimistic character, like Fantine. Many characters are hard to tell, such as Javert, who most likely thought he was optimistic by trying to clean up the country. Optimism and pessimism are constantly expressed in Les Miserables and add to make the characters become more realistic and authentic.Jean Valjean ends his 19-year prison sentence angry at society and having a pessimistic attitude. Soon he comes to the house of the warm-hearted bishop, M. Myriel, who eventually shows him that there is a good man deep down who must work to be honest once again. The bishop's words of kindness and forgiveness sink into Valjean to forever inspire him as a good natured person. Jean thinks twice about his cruel actions and eventually becomes very optimistic. This optimism shows through the entire book as he cares for Cossette and looks at the people around him. Jean Valjean is loved by the bishop and gains back the love for everyone around him, like Cossette. "The supreme happiness of life is the conviction that we are loved." (Fantine: Book Five - Chapter Four) Through the eyes of the reader, Javert looks like a bad man out to ruin the life of Jean Valjean. Really, Javert is a good law official trying to do his job by putting a criminal to justice. Javert wants to maintain order by destroying all of societies corruptions. In his view, Javert is an optimist trying to better a...

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