Origins Of Sociology Essay

1058 words - 4 pages

Origins of Sociology In today's ever changing world, we are constantly looking towards the future. While in the textbook of Macionis and Gerber we see them looking deeper than that, and into the "˜whys'. The Origins of Sociology is a topic of great interest and discussion, because it gives the individual the opportunity to look at how sociology has developed over the years, and to look at the socio-historical factors that play crucial roles in the development of the sociological apperception. In this essay I will look at how sociology emerged as an attempt to deal with the "problems of modernity", while also looking toward the future and the problems that may arise.To start off, I will deal with Auguste Comte and his definition of sociology in comparison to the ways others looked at sociology. His way of looking at sociology stemmed from a new way of looking at the world. His definition was a more broader, more open one than the thinkers of the past. He talks of how knowledge helps to build a better future for the individual. And in order to gain a better understanding of how society worked was to look at it from a scientific point of view. Comte talks of the three stages; the first being the theological stage "" which basically meant that thinking was guided by religion (Macionis and Gerber, 19??: 13). This was true; from the beginning to about the 1300's, mainly because the people around this time frame had nothing else to look towards. And their history told them that if you did not follow a certain way then you would be persecuted, or go to hell. People in those days had little knowledge of the ability to look beyond, or to look at their society from a different standpoint. Societies revolved around religion and the right religion at that, this was the only way.Next came the metaphysical stage according to Comte. This was the stage of people coming in to there own and looking towards the natural phenomenon. This is where the people started to look towards something other than "˜the way things were done in the past'. Once this stage got rolling it gave way to the final stage known as the scientific stage; which had the great scientists such as Copernicus, Galileo, Newton and finally Comte all looking into the deeper context of the world. This is where Comte made some of his major scientific contributions to the study of "˜society'. Becoming a "˜positivist', Comte believed that invariable laws controlled humans and society. But as sociology started to show, humans were much more complex, natural, phenomenon's, and they can't be controlled by "˜laws' governing their behavior.With the new science, "˜sociology', and the sociologists looking towards the study of society (from a different perspective than in the past), we see them looking at the problems that occur from ongoing modernization of these societies. And it is fair to say that sociology emerged for this reason. With all the scientific developments and...

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