Oscar Romero, Liberation Theology And The Catholic Church

3985 words - 16 pages

Oscar Romero, Liberation Theology and the Catholic Church

In the post-World War II era, the globe was polarized by two idealistically divergent superpowers; the United States and the Soviet Union, two nations that strived to promote capitalism and communism, respectively, throughout the globe. Nowhere was this struggle more apparent than in developing countries with shaky political and economic backbones. Specifically, in Latin America the old, corrupt and often totalitarian regimes were threatened by grassroots liberation movements whose ideas of land reform and shaking up the status quo were often perceived as Marxism. The Catholic Church, which had traditionally supported the wealthy ruling class, began to change its beliefs in the late 1960s and slowly increased its support for the oppressed working class. This trend gained momentum in the 1970s and 80s and became known as Liberation Theology. Although not officially supported and often chastised by the Vatican, Liberation Theology became prevalent throughout Latin America and violent revolutions sprang up in Brazil, Nicaragua, El Salvador and Mexico, sometimes with the tacit blessing of important religious leaders. By the early 1990s, however, this aggressive brand of Liberation Theology and the political uprisings that often went hand in hand were more or less dead. Pope John Paul II had condemned the use of the pulpit for political purposes and many of the more virulent religious leaders had been forcibly removed by the Vatican from their respective posts.

Today, the Catholic Church appears to be ambivalent towards the current political and economic situation in Latin America. While Pope John Paul II condemns what he has referred to as “savage capitalism” in the Western hemisphere and called for a reevaluation of the uneven allocation of wealth in so-called banana republics, he has also stymied efforts by the church to help out those that are being socially marginalized. One important indicator on the Catholic Church’s stance on Liberation Theology and general social activism in Latin America will be to see if Archbishop Oscar Romero is accepted into sainthood. The iconic and controversial religious leader worked tirelessly to help the lower-class in El Salvador. His teachings and beliefs that the marginalized peasants should be treated justly made him a living legend among his countrymen and isolated him from the nation’s corrupt elites. Although he never specifically condoned violence, his sermons played no small part in fomenting a bloody peasant uprising and civil war that raged for over a decade. In the last few years, a strong effort has been made to canonize Romero. Although he is revered not only in his own country but throughout the world, there exist a few issues that could possibly preclude him for becoming a saint. He is still strongly disliked by the vast majority of the wealthy and powerful ruling class of El Salvador, he, indirectly and inadvertently,...

Find Another Essay On Oscar Romero, Liberation Theology and the Catholic Church

AIDS - and the Catholic Church

1231 words - 5 pages proposals are impractical and inhumane to deny a dying person his or her right to peace and time with family in their last moments. People living with HIV/AIDS face discrimination which is dehumanizing and suffering which strips the person's sense of worth and dignity. Tackling the problematic AIDS isn't easy, and ethics, morals and strong influence from the Catholic Church are all contributors to this issue.AIDS has seen the country of Africa

Chaucer and the Catholic Church Essay

1023 words - 5 pages By the late 14th century, the Catholic Church was the main influential power in Europe. As the clergy’s influence increased, the continent’s wealth began to decline. Amidst a century of poverty, plague, and unemployment, criticism of the church arose. The people deemed the clergy hypocritical for preaching against greed, but yet keeping all of the wealth to themselves. Cathedrals were built as shrines, embellished in gold and rich jewels

Oscar Romero, “School of the Americans.”

1096 words - 5 pages Óscar Arnulfo Romero y Galdámez was a bishop from the Catholic Church in the Salvador. He turned out to be the fourth Archbishop of San Salvador after Luis Chavez in February of 1977. Bishop Romero was born in August 15 of 1917 and dies March 24 of 1980 in the Salvador. During his youth, he got accepted into a minor seminary in San Miguel when he was thirteen, then he was also got accepted to the national seminary in San Salvador but he got the

King Arthur And The Catholic Church

603 words - 2 pages The Catholic Church has many influences on King Arthur and the rest of his Knights of the Round Table. The knights depended on the church for its teachings and the great power the church held in society. The Knights of the Round Table pledged great loyalty to the church. Also the knights held the teachings of the church in great reverence and were never disloyal to the church. There are many links between the Catholic Church and the way that

Napoleon Bonaparte and the Catholic Church

2182 words - 9 pages Tension grew between the Catholic Church and France during the French Revolution, leading to a schism, which deeply devastated the Church’s economy. Pope Pius VII and Napoleon Bonaparte came into power as the French Revolution was ending. For different reasons they both saw the importance of restoring Roman Catholicism’s position in France. The Catholic Church’s initial support of Napoleon greatly affected both parties (O’Dwyer 12-14, 43, 49

Homosexual Marriage and the Catholic Church

2965 words - 12 pages Homosexual Marriage and the Catholic Church Imagine you were born into a world where being straight was taboo. You were raised by same sex parents, as all of your friends. Fornication of the opposite sex was merely to have children, but a relationship between the two was virtually unheard of. It was believed that same sex parents provided a better home for children. Love between a man and a man (or a woman and a woman) was believed

History and the Roman Catholic Church

3239 words - 13 pages History and Christianity Christianity most specifically, the Holy Roman Catholic Church has been involved in the world throughout time. Since Christianity, when if first became a major religion in society the involvement of the Roman Catholic Church has affected many areas of history. The Roman Catholic Church has affected the world historically, as demonstrated by it's impact upon the historical figures like Hypatia, Joan of Arc, and Jan Hus

History and the Roman Catholic Church

3270 words - 13 pages Sometimes during interrogations of “witches”, the Roman Catholic Church did not oversee the tortures, exempting the rule of shedding no blood. In this instance, people accused of being witches could be skinned alive, disemboweled, drawn and quartered, or any other variation of many torturous forms of punishment. Most commonly, death and torture was done by burning at the stake. At the death of the “witch” the Roman Catholic Church would order

Magdalene Laundries: Society and the Catholic Church

1251 words - 6 pages inmates were beaten, dehumanized, humiliated and stripped of their dignity. This film, based on the documentary Sex in a Cold Climate, highlights the reciprocal influence of the Catholic Church and society that formed the views and treatment of women, which ultimately led to the creation and perpetuation of Magdalene laundries until 1996. Following the creation of the Irish Free State, the heavily intertwined nature of Irish society and Catholicism

Body Art and the Catholic Church

1408 words - 6 pages Body Art and the Catholic Church I have always wondered if the Catholic church approved of tattooing and body piercing. I am not the type of person that most people think of when they think of tattooed or pierced individual. When I tell people that I have tattoos, people always say “but you don’t seem like the kind of person who would get a tattoo.” I personally do not believe that certain kinds of people get tattoos and I wondered what my

The Catholic Church

3564 words - 14 pages The Catholic Church The Catholic Church in the 20th Century underwent tremendous change, most significantly as a result of the Second Vatican Council. This Council created an atmosphere of reform within the leading theologians and the hierarchy of the Church. Consequently, when Pope Paul VI released his encyclical Humanae Vitae, to many of the reformers it seemed to contradict the sentiment of the Council. At the same time, though, there

Similar Essays

Roman Catholic Theology: Liberation Theology Essay

1076 words - 5 pages Liberation theology was considered both a radical and political movement in Roman Catholic Theology. It proposes the fight of poverty and goes in depth into the relationship of Christian theology and political activism. It interpreted Jesus’ teachings in relation to liberation through economic, political and social conditions. Liberation Theology spoke on how the Christian church should act in order to bring social change as well as support

Biblical Patriarchy In The Christian Church University Of San Diego, Thrs 114 Intro To Catholic Theology Research Paper

2389 words - 10 pages Arnold Jose THRS 114-Intro to Catholic Theology Professor Rafael Reyes May 24, 2017 Biblical Patriarchy in the Christian Church Over the course of human history, it has been a nearly universal norm for men to hold a dominant role in society. This system of society is known as patriarchy, and it is characterized by the supremacy of the father in the family in both domestic and religious functions, the legal dependence of the wife and children

The Lutheran Church And The Catholic Church

1052 words - 5 pages officially formed on January 1, 1988 and was a combination of three branches of the Lutheran religion: the American Lutheran church, the Association of Evangelical Lutheran churches, and the Lutheran Church in America. In 2012 the ELCA had 3,950,924 baptized members. Today, it is the seventh largest religious body and largest Lutheran denomination in the U.S. Luther, born in 1483, was a German monk and priest of the Catholic Church. While

The Catholic Church And Reformation Essay

1305 words - 6 pages In 16th century Europe the Catholic Church had become extremely powerful, and with this power came corruption. Two men stood to change the direction of Europe forever. The first Martin Luther was the decided leader of the Protestant Reformation and St Ignatius de Loyola was the leader of the Counter Reformation. These men did not know the impact they were to have on the Europe and the world, but in this essay I will explain who these men are