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Overcoming The Depths Of Darkness: The Hrrors Of The Hitler's Conquering Of Eastern Europe

1756 words - 7 pages

In life, often the thought of the significance of identity runs through our minds due to one's needs to determine their difference from others while maintaining their similarities with society's standards. Just as a butterfly whose wings, painted with vivid colors, wants to remain camouflaged among nature, the constant struggle to express oneself exists not just today but as a main factor in the life of one young boy during the Holocaust. Depicted through Elie Wiesel's heart wrenching words in the memoir, Night, the horrors of the Hitler's conquering of eastern Europe come to life during which Wiesel strives to sustain his faith in religion as well as his innocent view of humanity previous to his encounters and the bond that connects him to his family. Through these encounters in his teenage years, Wiesel overcame the depths of the Kingdom of Night, where he fell victim to the trap so long ago, now emerging with his identity recovered and intact as well as a dream to spread his universal message. In order to raise awareness for Human Rights around the world, he shares his experiences in the concentration camps to warn the world to make peace, to never allow the mistakes of the past to occur once more.
Identity circulates around one specific trait of oneself that often times, categorizes them which in Elie's case happens to be his faith, his strong religious beliefs as well as his desire to learn more about Jewish Mysticism. As the war slowly creeps upon the town of Sighet, he has no acknowledgment of the terrifying deeds of the Germans as they transport his family to Auschwitz, a death camp with the intent of eliminating all those discriminated by Hitler. Watching as people frantically toss valuable items into the dirt to prepare themselves for the journey ahead, doubt blossoms within the dark depths of his heart; "Valuable objects, precious rugs, silver candlesticks, Bibles and other ritual objects were strewn over the dusty grounds - pitiful relics that seemed to never to have had a home. All this under a magnificent blue sky" (Wiesel 15). The metaphor for God as the magnificent blue sky symbolizes that he questions why objects of value, even religion are tossed onto the ground as if they bear no significance while He remained silent up above. Nonetheless, hope and optimism thrives among the Jewish people of Sighet's hearts who seem to still believe there is light at the end of the tunnel. They never expect that for many, their fates shortly after arriving at Auschwitz goes up in flames in the crematorium. As Elie walks unknowingly towards the barracks, he hears those among him reciting prayers, causing anger to flare up inside; "Why should I sanctify His name? The Almighty, the eternal and terrible Master of the Universe, chose to be silent. What was there to thank Him for" (33)? From here, his faith continues to go downhill, each day a blow directed towards his mental sanity and identity. As one perceives, clearly the outcome of...

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