Overivew Of Childhood Obesity In The Us

2659 words - 11 pages

In 2012 CDC statistics show that over “35 percent of adults in the United States of America are recorded as obese (30kg/m2) and 32 percent of children.” The obesity rate has doubled since 1971.” Not only is epidemic growing in numbers of victims but also in expenses. The United States spend spent 147 billion dollars in 2008 on expenses medical costs yearly and that does not include the fight against the problem. “In 2003 over 300,000 died due to obesity related health problems, diseases and cancers.” One of the most important battles we wage on American soil is the war for citizens to be fit, and it almost always starts in the childhood. Since 1971 the problem of childhood and adult obesity started to grow annually due to many reasons related to our ways of living. Now the food industry including fast food has been getting more and more modified. What Americans eat is not organic anymore and is taking its toll. The fast food industry has been making advertisements and foods focused upon youth. Since the original commercials directed towards children, it has nearly tripled since the rise of technology. Technology has been growing rapidly as obesity is, statistics show that with the advancement of technology, the population starts to slow down, stop exercising and eating healthier foods. As long as there is childhood obesity there will be adult obesity, with effects on children causing obesity there will be a landslide of future medical problems such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancers and others. Not only is there strong physical damage to children but long term psychological damage such as low self esteem, depression, and anger. The government tries to fight this growing epidemic with schools and communities in an effort to fight this growing problem such as Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move!” program. Other than programs there are many things that the population can do as individuals and families. This growing epidemic has taken its toll for long enough and America is moving to stop obesity in its origins.
In 1963 to 1971 child obesity rates were at an even 4-5 percentage, then the percentage gradually rose from 71 to 2003 to 20 percent. Then in one decade the percentage of obesity rate rose by 15 percent to an overall high of 25 percent (See Appendix A). These victims fall to the obesity population from many different things generally lack of exercise and poor unhealthy diets. If you notice that as technology rises in advancements, so does the child and adult obese population. This is due to children staying indoors to play games, watch television or use the computer instead of exercising and playing outdoors. The severity of this problem has increased numbers of obese population severely, this is because active play has been supplanted by technology. Children ages eight to 14 watch an average of 3-6 hours a day of television, this is after school and is cut short by dinner generally, that leaves most of the day not doing...

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