Overview Of The Voyage Of St. Luis

2550 words - 10 pages

In nature, when the habitat of a specific species is being jeopardized, the expectations are for them to flee away and pursue refuge. After Hitler’s Final Solution in which declared that “[the Jewish] group in particular was targeted for mass, systematic, and complete destruction,” (Milgram 9) a number of Jews, as expected, made the rational choice of escaping the massive threat of complete genocide. Some methods were to migrate to random European countries that did not have solid affairs with Germany; other methods, however, were to pursue the intelligent strategy of fleeing to distant places, such as South America and the United States. A group of 937 Jews who decided to hide in the Americas boarded in the transatlantic S.S. St. Louis on May 13, 1939 at Hamburg, Germany with the destination to Havana, Cuba. The transatlantic sailed urgently from Germany because of the fact that Jewish citizens desperately had to escape the Holocaust, encounter refuge, and a few passengers had a secret mission regarding the American military force.
It was July 18, 1925 when Adolf Hitler's autobiography "Mein Kampf" was initially published in Germany theorizing his plans for a futuristic prosperous nation where the Aryans - naturally white Germans - would peacefully live under the commands of the fascist leader in a place without "impure" people. Falling under this category of "impurity" were communists, socialists, mentally and physically disabled people, children, the elderly, homosexuals, criminals, nonconformists and principally the Jews. Hitler's plans changed from theory to practice in 1933 when the nation became the Third Reich, which relatively is commonly known as Nazi Germany.
The Third Reich was under Hitler's power, which resulted in the initiation of his project that would either mindlessly deport or radically exterminate a large fraction of the country's population. Therefore, his morally insane plans were defined to be his "Final Solution", which became notorious after the night of November 9-10, 1938, specifically known as Kristallnacht (or "Night of The Broken Glass"). In reference to this, Avraham Milgram, author of The Holocaust Frequently Asked Questions, defines this event as "a concerted campaign of murder, arson, and looting against the Jewish population in Germany, Austria, and the newly annexed Sudeten area of Czechoslovakia." (Milgram 15). Consequentially, this frightened every living Jew residing in the vicinity.
The main getaway route for hundreds of Jews was the transatlantic previously mentioned as the S.S. St. Louis which would transport the fugitives away from the chaos. Although immigration policies were tougher after the US Immigration and Nationality Act of 1924 which “strictly limited the number of immigrants who could be admitted to the United States each year,” (“Voyage of The St. Louis”) a high number of Jews - as expected - were still emigrating to America; however, “in 1939, the annual combined German-Austrian immigration...

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