Overview: Prague, The City In The Heart Of Europe

1475 words - 6 pages

With the bordering countries of Germany, Austria, Poland, and Slovakia, Prague the capital city of the Czech Republic, lies within a equidistance of the Baltic, Mediterranean, and North Sea, thus it is said to be located in the heart of Europe. An up close look at the city of Prague, shows two sections of land divided by the Vltava River. These main two sections of Prague are known as Lesser Town and Old Town. An even closer look shows these two sections of Prague are made up of separate districts each with its own name and unique characteristics (Prague Experience). These districts of Lesser Town, Castle District, Old Town, Josefov or Jewish district, and New Town each with their own history, architectural landmarks, and cultural experiences make up the beautiful city of Prague.
Lesser Town, also known as Lesser and Little Quarter, is the oldest section of Prague. The original settlement of Prague occurred in the area of present day Lesser Town during the 8th century, but it was not until, 1257 that it was formally established as Lesser Town by Premysl Otakar II. Although Lesser Town was destroyed twice, one in 1419 by a battle and again in 1514 by fire, some of its original buildings can still be found now being used as restaurants and pubs, some with interesting stories attached. The majority of Lesser Town however, is made up of Baroque Palaces and Churches dating back to the 17th and 18th centuries(Prague Experience). At the center of Lesser Town is the Lesser Town square, known as the Malostranske Namesti in Czech (Soukup,127). The area is now filled with offices, foreign embassies, and with gardens (Wilson, 81). At the center of the town square is St. Nicholas Church. Began in 1703 the St. Nicholas Church in Lesser Town is one of three in Prague. The Church constructions was started by Christoph and Kilian Ignaz Dientzenhofer. The church was finally finished un 1756 by Kilian’s son-in-law Anselmo Lurage. This church is filled with a variety of paintings and a Baroque style organ that was played by Mozart (Prague Experience). Another attraction in Lesser Town is the Lennon Wall. After the murder of John Lennon, many Czechs became inspired by his works. An image of Lennon soon appeared in a square on the other side of the French embassy. Though the secret police attempted to cover this image with white wash, Lennon’s Wall still exists with contributions from different Czechs and tourists (Wilson,83). One of the main streets in Lesser Town is Nerudova street. Along this street are the Baroque palaces, further up the street is our next stop, Prague Castle District.
The Prague Castle District dates back to the 9th century when Prince Borivoj founded the settlement on the hill above Lesser Town. The castle has been rebuilt many times indifferent styles depending on the time period of the reconstruction. This area till has buildings, churches, and towers built in are styles beginning in the gothic period all the way to the Neo Classical...

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