Owen's Dulce Et Decorum Est Pro Patria Mori

1361 words - 5 pages

Through the use of poetry, we are able to powerfully discuss an idea or opinion about certain topics that could not be so eloquently conveyed through other literary media. Wilfred Owen was both a Soldier Poet during WWI. He was a man firmly against the idea of sending young boys off to war with the promise of glory. His views of war and the gruesome reality that it is, is deeply rooted within this poem and emphasized though the use of vivid imagery, persuasive similes and carefully constructed figurative language. Owen’s opinion that death by war is neither “sweet nor proper” as the sarcastic title suggests; resonates straight through to the last line – Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori2, which is rightfully preceded by the phrase “The old Lie.”
This poem brilliantly shows how thoughtful use of effective words can shape our feelings and emotions. With this in mind, the first line of this poem begins with a powerful simile, “Bent double, like old beggars under sacks.” Here we get a strong comparison; an image of a duality within the soldiers. Once proud serving men, to now bent and crippled creatures, hobbling about like dirty, mud covered old beggars. The strength in these first few words is immense. Not only as a simile but also as bold imagery. I could write an entire essay on the effectiveness of this carefully constructed first line, the colors and sounds that come to mind are incredible, but I digress; let’s continue on. In addition to powerful line one, we are thrown into an equally powerful line two. “Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge.” Owen again uses a brilliant simile; showing the humanistic side of the once proud and innocent soldiers; to this now creature like hag. The word hag itself implies, perhaps a villainous character-a comparison between a soldier and a witch: a literary allusion. It’s as if the soldiers have lost all sense of their prior selves and have forgotten what they were fighting for. The war has turned them hard like haggard old witches, under burlap sacks, hobbling about with no hope, only despair. Alliteration is also used to effectively enhance this line. The repeated ‘k’ sounds in “knock-kneed,” “coughing,” “like,” and “cursed,” start to give an actual coughing sound, implying sickness and death. In line 6 alliteration is used again, “limped,” “blood-shod,” “all,” “lame,” “all,” “blind.” The ‘l’s’ somehow slowly roll off your tongue, making this line seem to go on forever. Which lends itself to emphasizing the endless amount of marching, toward no real destination. Owen also makes a comment that the men are now like zombies, and “marched asleep,” not even aware that “many had lost their boots.” By the end of the first stanza we are well aware that the men have lost their identity. And with the loss of identity comes the loss of hope.
In the second stanza Owen’s usage of dynamic imagery continues. He recalls a deadly gas attack in which the men, in an panicked filled frenzy,...

Find Another Essay On Owen's Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori

Dulce et Decorum Est Essay

1091 words - 4 pages alliteration to quicken the rhythm during the battle in order to recreate the drama of the battle. Owen uses plosive alliteration to evoke an angry tone in verse three, "My friend, you would not tell with such high zest, To children ardent for some desperate glory, The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori." This verse is directed at the authority figures! In the "Charge of the Light Brigade" onomatoepia is used to communicate the bravery

Meaninglessness Glory in Wilfred Owen's Dulce Et Decorum Est

796 words - 3 pages Meaninglessness Glory in Wilfred Owen's Dulce Et Decorum Est It is sweet and proper to die for one’s country. Sweet! And decorous! If in some smothering dreams you too could pace behind that wagon, my friend, you would not tell with such high zest to children ardent for some desperate glory that old lie…. Wilfred Owen titles his poem the Latin translation of what he refers to as “The old Lie” (Dulce Et Decorum Est), and sets out to

Astonishing Imagery in Wilfred Owen's Poem, Dulce et Decorum Est

522 words - 2 pages The poem ‘Dulce et Decorum Est’ by Wilfred Owen portrays the horrors of World War I with the horrific imagery and the startling use of words he uses. He describes his experience of a gas attack where he lost a member of his squadron and the lasting impact it had on him. He describes how terrible the conditions were for the soldiers and just how bad it was. By doing this he is trying to help stop other soldiers from experiencing what happened in

Dulce Et Decorum Est

1211 words - 5 pages one’s country”. Owen uses irony by firstly, naming his poem after this known phrase, and then mainly writing against it to bring to light the true trauma’s of war. Just about all the graphic descriptions in the body of the poem lead up to the last two lines (“Dulce Et Decorum Est, Pro Patria Mori”), which show us that the reality out on the battlefield did not match the glorious and prestigious statements of war that were ubiquitous at the time

Dulce et decorum est

648 words - 3 pages they were getting themselves into because of the propaganda used. Also, most of the volunteers were young men, and many of those were still only teenagers. The message 'Dulce et decorum pro patria mori was used in this propaganda campaign and had been widely believed before the war. I think it was very brave to go against this and say it was an 'old lie' not the truth as the government wanted people to believe.

Dulce et Decorum Est

1157 words - 5 pages brought upon the soldiers. The lines at the end of the poem are “The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori.” (Owen 696) which translate roughly to “It is sweet and right to die for one's country.” (Poem and Notes) The use of irony is very heavy in these last lines because the entire poem was a description of how awful the war was for the speaker and his fellow soldiers, yet he ends it by saying dying for one’s country is an honorable death

dulce et decorum est

583 words - 2 pages 2. "Dulce et Decorum Est" by Wilfred Owen"Dulce et Decorum Est" is written by Wilfred Owen, a poet who was participating in World War 1. He experienced the battlefield and grew disillusioned with the war, as he faced the gruesome truth. He came home in 1917 with broken nerves, however he returned to war because he wanted to help other soldiers. Unfortunately, he died just a day before Armistice Day. Owen wrote a few poems before his death and

Dulce et Decorum Est

583 words - 2 pages 2. "Dulce et Decorum Est" by Wilfred Owen"Dulce et Decorum Est" is written by Wilfred Owen, a poet who was participating in World War 1. He experienced the battlefield and grew disillusioned with the war, as he faced the gruesome truth. He came home in 1917 with broken nerves, however he returned to war because he wanted to help other soldiers. Unfortunately, he died just a day before Armistice Day. Owen wrote a few poems before his death and

"Dulce Et Decorum Est"

589 words - 2 pages for the other soldiers. The last verse "Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori", shows us the sarcasm that the poet uses. "The old Lie" he says it to be, what the people said, but isn't true at all. To die for your county isn't sweet and honorable. They use you as a form to win more, to get more power and the worse of all is that during this, is that every minute you are close to death.

Dulce et Decorum Est

610 words - 2 pages portray the reality of war. These images made me feel disgusted at what war is capable of. The author ends this poem with the last line in Latin. The motto "Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori" means "It is sweet and fitting to die for one's country". This is one of my most well liked poems because it is so open and true. It is a haunting yet depressing poem. It paints a horrible picture in my mind of the horrors that occurred at the time

Dulce et decorum est

895 words - 4 pages ironically with the use of the saying “Dulce et Decorum est Pro patria mori.” Which translates to is sweet and glorious to die for one’s country. This phrase is one that the greater public knew and understood. Owen’s work is for the masses, with the use of the simple and casual language in the poem. He primarily envisioned his work to be directed towards men who were eager to enlist into the army and have it work as a deterrent or at least a warning

Similar Essays

Dulce Et Decorum Est Pro Patria Mori

594 words - 2 pages his gas mask. "In all my dreams, before my helpless sight, he plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning". This horrible nightmare stained with green light reflecting the bewilderment of evacuation. Those who survived this horrible odyssey back from the trenches were scarred eternally from the torture they endured. No one can blame them if they did not ever wish to experience these sufferings again. This attitude was portrayed in the last line of the poem "The old lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori.(It is sweet and honorable to die for the fatherland)"

Wilfred Owen's Representation Of War In "Dulce Et Decorum Est Pro Patria Mori"

1247 words - 5 pages "Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori", "it is sweet and right to die for your country", is a phrase that was widely used at the time of World War I to glorify the war and to encourage young men to fight. This saying became a form of a moral inducement for many young men to take part in World War I, because it created the idea that the soldier's death for his country is highly admirable and patriotically heroic. Wilfred Owen, on the other hand

Wilfred Owen: 'dulce Et Decorum Est Pro Patria Mori'

701 words - 3 pages " wouldn't tell children "with such zest" about the war, you wouldn't glorify it if you saw what I see. And at the end he says "The old lie: Dulce es decorum est pro patria mori" is it sweet and right to die for your fatherland, for your country.Looking at what Owen has described in his poem I feel that war isn't a craze to be glorified, but a man made destruction which is worse than what the devil can impose on us. We save little and lose what we can

Dulce Et Decorum Est Pro Pateria Mori...Or Is It?

1132 words - 5 pages Dulce et Decorum est Pro Patria Mori(Or is it?)Despite the government's knowledge of the intense horrors of war, they persist on sending innocent soldiers onto the battlefield. Two pieces of literature used to describe these intense horrors are the novel All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque and the poem Dulce et Decorum est by Wilfred Owen. Both authors, soldiers of WWI, write about their experience in the war and both pieces