Paridise Lost Essay

706 words - 3 pages

June 3, 1998 world Literature The Root of All Evil The early modern period contains many characteristics that involve the process of branching out into new forms and ideas. These new ideas are based on everything from personal issues to government issues. They are also from individual downfalls and downfalls of their society. Throughout this style of literature there is an emphasis on reader involvement and a change on how religious characters are portrayed. This change places the characters of the text into perspective for both the reader and the writer. In Milton's Paradise Lost he uses these characteristics. He does not put the main emphasis of his text on God, like most early literature of the time period. He draws the reader's attention towards Satan and towards evil, almost discrediting everything that is good. This is a new twist for literature. Milton uses evil to attract the reader's attention. While at the same time involving the emotions of the reader. This develops a totally new perspective of religion, and develops a different perspective on such a prominent subject and characterizes the period.Satan is shown extremely early in the text and is an fact a lead character throughout. After Milton quickly discusses man's disobedience to God and the loss of Eden, he immediately focuses the readers attention to Satan. This is a different angle than that of earlier literature, because this text allows the reader to understand the sins of the character. At this point Satan contains some qualities of Heaven but they are perverted. This perversion is evil and Milton believes this evil is attractive. This attraction diverts the readers attention to this character and involves the readers emotions toward the character.Milton also uses this attention technique when Satan is talking to himself. Here he recalls his glorious life in Heaven and how distinguished his position was at that time. He admiringly states that God created him and how easy it was to serve and praise him. Also, as if crying for sympathy, he states how there is no...

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