This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Parkinson's Law Essay

2371 words - 9 pages

According to Parkinson’s Law the growth in the number of managers and hierarchical levels is controlled by two principles: (1) “An official wants to multiply subordinates, not rivals,” and (2) “Officials make work for one another (Parkinson 14).” Hence, managers are building an empire for themselves, a tall hierarchy. The higher the empire increases, the higher the managers position become in the organization.

One of the main reasons why managers create subordinates is to decrease the load of their work. Even if their heavy load of work is real or imaginary, sometimes it is due to their own decreasing energy or getting older. There are three possible solutions to this dilemma, the manager (1) can resign, (2) request a partner, or (3) request subordinates. If managers resign, then they will lose their pensions. If managers request a partner that is on their same level in the organization, then they will be bringing in competition for promotion to the next level. The only logical and beneficial solution for them is to request the assistance of subordinates, which will divide the work among their subordinates. Then, the manager will be the only one to understand the subordinate’s work as a whole. To create a visual:
“Suppose a manager called A, request two subordinates called C and D. When C complains in turn of being overworked (as he certainly will) A will, with the concurrence of C, advise the appointment of two assistants to help C. But he can then avert internal friction only by advising the appointment of two more assistants to help D, whose position is much the same. With this recruitment of E, F, G and H the promotion of A is now practically certain (Parkinson 14).”
The draw back to this solution is that manager A will be actually working much harder than before. For example:
“An incoming document may well come before each of them in turn. Official E decides that it falls within the province of F, who places a draft reply before C, who amends it drastically before consulting D, who asks G to deal with it. But G goes on leave at this point, handing the file over to H, who drafts a minute that is signed by D and returned to C, who revises his draft accordingly and lays the new version before A.
What does A do? He would have every excuse for signing the thing unread, for he has many other matters on his mind. Knowing now that he is to succeed W next year, he has to decide whether C or D should succeed to his own office. But A is a conscientious man. Beset as he is with problems created by his colleagues for themselves and for him – created by the mere fact of these officials’ existence – he is not the man to shirk his duty. He reads through the draft with care, deletes the fussy paragraphs added by C and H, and restores the thing to the form preferred in the first instance by the able (if quarrelsome) F. He finally produces the same reply he would have written if officials C and H had never been born. And it is late in the...

Find Another Essay On Parkinson's Law

Stem Cell- clearly describes the benefits of stem cell research to modern medical research and advancement- done for a high school Anatomy/Physiology class-5 pages

1709 words - 7 pages country to legalize cloning, which it did in order to allow scientists to create cloned embryos for stem cell research. Scientists can destroy donated fertility clinic embryos for stem cells and other research, and are allowed to create allowed to create embryos by in vitro fertilization (IVF). Now, the new law allows researchers to create stem cells by cloning. All embryos involved in research must be destroyed after 14 days. JAPAN: The

California Proposition 71 - Stem Cell Research

598 words - 2 pages embryonic stem cell research is done on embryos. Embryonic stem cell research is a highly controversial issue, due to the fact that many believe it is killing a baby before it can be born. Some of the many diseases which could be cured through stem cell research include Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, arthritis, AIDS, HIV, cancer, spinal cord injuries (or paralysis), and diabetes. These are just some of the many diseases that this

The Heated Debate Concerning Stem Cell Research

1002 words - 4 pages clinical trials have already indicated significant potential benefit, include: Parkinson’s Heart Valve Replacement Alzheimer’s Diabetes/Pancreatic Disorders Nerve Damage Muscle Regeneration Organ Transplantation/Growth Blood Production “In 1998, More than 50 disease advocates and scientific societies, representing such concerns as diabetes, blindness, Parkinson's disease, glaucoma, AIDS, Down Syndrome, cystic fibrosis, stroke, lymphoma, infertility

Abortion

758 words - 3 pages Court in 5-4 rulings upheld provisions of a 1986 Missouri law and a 1989 Pennsylvania law restricting abortion. In Webster vs. Reproductive Health Services and Planned Parenthood vs. Casey the court stopped short of overturning the landmark Roe vs. Wade ruling, but it upheld the power of individual states to impose restrictions. The battle over abortion rights moved to the state legislatures and to the streets as massive demonstrations for and

Adult Versus Embryonic: The Controversial Stem Cell Research Debate

2189 words - 9 pages . Among those patients are spinal cord injury patients, heart patients, patients stricken with vision ailments, autoimmune diseases such as diabetes, MS, certain types of cancers, anemia, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The list of proven therapies is long and the list of potential therapies is even longer. Studies have shown that patients have already reaped the benefits from many therapies to date. There have been spinal cord studies that

Adult Versus Embryonic: The Controversial Stem Cell Research Debate

2189 words - 9 pages . Among those patients are spinal cord injury patients, heart patients, patients stricken with vision ailments, autoimmune diseases such as diabetes, MS, certain types of cancers, anemia, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The list of proven therapies is long and the list of potential therapies is even longer. Studies have shown that patients have already reaped the benefits from many therapies to date. There have been spinal cord studies that

The Benefits Genetic Engineering for Medical Purposes

957 words - 4 pages stem cells are taken from human fetal tissue and human embryos. Scientists once believed that human adult stem cells could be used, but that idea was quickly put to rest when scientists discovered that the cells may be damaged by sunlight or toxins in the air, as well as the fact that adult stem cells may contain more DNA abnormalities. Stem cell research could one day lead to the cures of diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's

stem cell research

761 words - 3 pages . Diseases such as Diabetes, Bone Marrow Cancer, Chronic Heart disease, Parkinson's, and Alzheimer's disease are just a few that could all be cured with the use of stem cells.      As of May 18 2001, scientists have grown blood cells, blood vessel cells, bone cartilage, neurons, and skeletal muscle in petri dishes and continue to grow many other types of cells. This is encouraging news because a lot of diseases involve the

How euthanasia should be legalized

773 words - 3 pages came when, fully conscious, she would choke to death. She begged the Courts to reassure her that a doctor would be allowed to assist her in choosing the moment of death. They refused. She lived on in terror, helped eventually by a doctor who, in February 1994, covertly broke the law to help her die in peace. A law on assisted suicide with rigorous safeguards could have saved her the nightmare during those months before her death, given her the

Politics of Stem Cell Research

1658 words - 7 pages "It's time to lift the political barriers blocking the stem cell research that could treat or cure diseases like Parkinson's. I believe that science can bring hope to our families. I want America to lead the world in the medical breakthroughs of the future. There's no time to wait. At stake are millions of lives. I'm John Kerry and I approved this message because America can do better. It's time to take America in a new direction." Senator

Research paper on Stem Cell Therapy

1676 words - 7 pages the use of existing stem cells in research to cure or treat dozens of serious diseases such as Alzheimer's, diabetes, heart disease, and Parkinson's disease?" Don't you think that it would good idea to help cure diseases? Well, most of the people in the United States do, too. There has to be something good about curing people. It also shows that it is the will of the people.In the case of embryonic stem cell research, we are divided on our

Similar Essays

Fetal Tissue Transplants Are Unethical Essay

1532 words - 6 pages pursuing a policy of not supporting or denying funding for fetal tissue research. As a result, research involving fetal tissue from induced abortions are now permitted under federal law. Fetal tissue transplants affect many people. Anyone with a neurodegenerative disorder is affected by the procedure. The transplants are used to treat diseases such as Parkinson's. Tremors, ridgedness, and hypokentetics are some of the symptoms that

Stem Cell Debate And Resolution Essay

3378 words - 14 pages shown in rats,embryonic stem cells were used to treat a Parkinson's-like condition in mice and rats, andscientists caused new brain cells to grow from adult stem cells in birds,Canadian and Italian scientists transplanted adult stem cells from the brains of mice into the bone marrow of other rodents. The stem cells changed and began making blood cells.Movement was restored in paralyzed mice and rats by injecting stem cells into the spinal fluid.In

Conflict Between Stem Cell Research And Ethics

1382 words - 6 pages religious and political leaders contend that embryonic stem cells are obtained from living fetuses and to remove the stem cells is to destroy the fetus. They believe that an embryo is a human person.Significant research supports potential cures for diseases such as diabetes, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's. Supporters believe that since the embryos are to be destroyed anyway, the embryos should be donated to research. President Bush allowed the use of

Pierre Elliott Trudeau: His Life And Political Career

797 words - 3 pages an entrepreneur, who made his fortune on a chain of gas stations. Most people, even Pierre himself, say that he is much more like his father, although Charles Trudeau died when Pierre was only 15. After high school, Trudeau studied law at the University de Montreal. There, though, when he became the University's student body leader, was the first time he realized he was interested in politics. Years later, he became parliamentary secretary to