Partition As Madness Essay

684 words - 3 pages

If I be allowed to quote from the movie,
"The land is divided, lives are shattered
Storms rage in every heart; it's the same here and there...
Funeral pyres in every home; the flames mount higher
Every city is deserted; it's the same here and there..
No one heeds the Gita; no one heeds the Koran
Faith has lost all meaning; here or there...."
The partition of India and its subsequent independence is the most barbaric incident in the history of India. Millions of people were forced to leave their homes and many were butchered in the worst possible ways. There was an unorganised and unplanned brutality. The unbelievable part was how could our sense of moral righteousness be handicapped by the actions of a few. How could it be that the same people who had driven the Britishers out of 'their' country could in turn start killing each other. The communal politics reached every nook and cranny in India polluting whole of the country ...view middle of the document...

The madness originated due to the confusion during partition was even more venomous than the earlier madness.
So, what is a nation? What is it that binds its people together? What is national integrity, after all? Does discriminating against the north-eastern make us an expatriot? What is the significance of these shadowy lines on the daily lives of the people? Is partition a gash in the body of the history of the two nations? So many years have passed, the wound has healed but the scar remains. Or should it be seen as the eventual development of a strange cancer? It built eventually became so bad that the state had to severe.
Can I be patriotic even while saying that in the post-partition period, it was not just the Hindus in Pakistan who suffered, but the Muslims in India were also equally affected as is evident from the movie?
In the story, the mad naked radio engineer shows complete abandonment from any communal identity. It signifies that humanity knows no religion and that all humans are alike. Ironically, the mad people are portrayed as saner than the sane people who were responsible for the insane division of the nation. Maybe, madness is a metaphor for sanity.
Who are the lunatics responsible for this lunacy? The simple answer would be 'polticians'. As the common belief would answer, was it really Jinnah? Considering that he was an atheist and was a highly westernized man, can we even expect him to pose such a communal demand of a separate nation for Muslims? Who is to be blamed then?
Is this a widespread madness that looms over the entire India and Pakistan? There can be two answers to this question. One can be that the whole of partition was a madness and that this is not who we really are. We look back at it and wish it never would have happened. Are we ready to accept this interpretation and if we are, would we still be called patriotic? That is a question we need to ask ourselves. The other interpretation has to be that partition is the perfect example of the real madness in us. It is representative of who we really are. It's up to us what we want to believe.

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