Social Class Distinction In Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

795 words - 3 pages

Have you ever thought of how social and economic classes work into a capitalist system? Marxists believe that different social and economic classes should be equal. In the book the “Great Gatsby” written by F. Scott Fitzgerald these classes are very much defined and show the flaws and reality of how social and economic classes are viewed through Marxists. Viewing the classes through vulgar Marxists the characters attempting to climb social and economical ladders in the book are not accepted and rejected from upper class individuals. “The Great Gatsby” shows that people attempting to be something he or she is not does not mean they have achieved these social and economic goals and will be rejected by the very people they are attempting to mirror.
The upper class characters belief in their superiority allow them to see themselves as better than others and allows them to live carelessly. Throughout the story Tom and Daisy make many careless decisions and talk down to those who are not as wealthy and have the same social status as them, knowing that they can fall back on their money and the people in working classes who they hire or can pay for help or support. For example, Daisy is willing to allow Gatsby to take the blame for her killing Mrytle and Tom allows George to believe that Gatsby is actually the killer of his wife. Just as in society upper class or those with money keep on making their money and can allow themselves to make careless massive mistakes knowing that they will have money and working class people to fall back on once those mistakes are realized. These types of careless mistakes are seen on news channels daily as celebrities, athletes, and wealthy individuals get into legal trouble and are able to pay their way out of trouble or receive much less of a punishment then associates in working classes.
In “The Great Gatsby” the classes are very influential. Rich and upper class live in East and West Egg and poor, almost peasant appearing individuals live in the valley of ashes. Fitzgerald making these living arrangements almost mocks at how vulgar Marxists believe working classes will keep the superstructure together. These working class individuals are portrayed throughout the book as being hardworking and looked down on by upper class. In the book Tom...

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