"Social Linguistics And Literacy" By James Paul Gee

950 words - 4 pages

This is a little summary of the essay.In this report James Paul Gee (1996) from his book Social Linguistics And Literacy has given the idea that literacy is not just the ability to read and write but it is mush more than that. It is the knowledge of different "discourses" which are part of our personalities and the knowledge of the beliefs and values connected to these discourses. He also gives the idea of a liberating literacy which "can be used as a meta-language or a meta- discourse ( a set of meta-words, meta-values, meta-beliefs) for the critique of other literacy and the way they constitute us as persons and situate us in society."This is the essayPOSITION PAPER ON FREERE'S PADAGOGY OF THE OPPRESSEDJames Paul Gee (1996) in his book Social Linguistics And Literacy has given the idea that literacy is not just the ability to read and write but it is mush more than that. It is the knowledge of different "discourses" which are part of our personalities and the knowledge of the beliefs and values connected to these discourses. He also gives the idea of a liberating literacy which "can be used as a meta-language or a meta- discourse ( a set of meta-words, meta-values, meta-beliefs) for the critique of other literacy and the way they constitute us as persons and situate us in society."(p.144). This liberating literacy, according to Gee along with one's knowledge of failing to master fully the mainstream or the dominant culture is a strong "theory of the society and one's position in it, that is, a base for resistance to oppression and inequality."(p.147) Friere (1970) in Pedagogy of the Oppressed is making the same assertion as Gee that to remove oppression in any social context the oppressed and those who truly feel one with the oppressed are the only people who can change the situation. They can change the social condition only by acquiring the knowledge of their own degraded situation in society. This consciousness of the oppressed is the only instrument that can bring the revolutionary transformation in a dehumanizing society.These days the modern psychology of learning and the constructivist approach to education gives us the idea of a pedagogy that has "the task of recreating that knowledge"(p.69) as its main objective. It deals with knowledge as the understanding of oneself as part of the world and the understanding of the world as a whole in which one is a part. This pedagogy enables students to "develop their power to perceive critically the way they exist in the world with which and in which they find themselves."(p.83) In this modern approach to education the meanings and understandings of the learners are emphasized and the curriculum has to be changed according to the needs of the learners. John Dewey (1938) in Experience and Education tried to evaluate this progressive education on rational grounds. He tried to rationalize the need for a progressive education based on...

Find Another Essay On "Social Linguistics And Literacy" by James Paul Gee

Kingdom of Matthias by Paul E Johnson and Sean Wilentz

1162 words - 5 pages The Kingdom of Matthias by Paul E. Johnson and Sean Wilentz is a story of the rise and fall of a religious cult established by Robert Matthews (Matthias). Within his kingdom, Matthias and his followers, abided by Matthias, believes of the subjugation of women by men. Even though at the time the cult was in existence the United States was experiencing two great movements that urged the forward progression of women, the Market Revolution and the

Kingdom of Matthias by Paul E.Johnson and Sean Wilentz

1174 words - 5 pages In the Kingdom of Matthias told by Paul E. Johnson and Sean Wilentz, tells a story of a peculiar religious sect, but changed the American society and culture. The story brings rise to changes in economy, sex, politics, religion and race and also the beginning of the Protestant revival known as the Second Great Awakening. Through the story of Matthias and Elijah Pierson, there were many changes in society but a main change was the gender roles

Truth and Lies in The Pigman by Paul Zindel

1239 words - 5 pages Truth and lies are always in a constant battle; the battle of choosing the truth or giving in and telling a lie. This theme is prevalent in The Pigman by Paul Zindel. The book takes place in Staten Island, New York. It follows a set of events told by two narrators, John and Lorraine. The two narrators are typing the story on a borrowed typewriter in the library. John and Lorraine are writing about what happened to them when they met Mr. Pignati

State Government and Economic Performance by Dr. Paul Brace

2107 words - 8 pages State Government and Economic Performance by Dr. Paul Brace In this paper we are asked to read the text by Dr. Paul Brace, "State Government & Economic Performance," from that we are to decide as if we were the governor of the state of Kansas, which economic development strategy would be best for Kansas. Out of the four choices we were given, Arizona, Texas, Michigan, New York, I have chosen to argue for the example of Michigan. Before I go

Comparing Women by Henry James and Charlotte Perkins Gilman

2656 words - 11 pages Comparing Women by Henry James and Charlotte Perkins Gilman In American literature, women have been portrayed differently depending on the sex and race of the author. Henry James who wrote “Daisy Miller: A Study” (1878) characterized Daisy as a tramp who breaks expatriate social customs. When a male writes about a woman, she is sometimes portrayed as a troublemaker and often up to no good. On the other hand, in Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s

Foreshadowing and Flashback in The Scarlet Ibis by James Hurst

1186 words - 5 pages Foreshadowing and Flashback in “The Scarlet Ibis” Regrets are one of the few factors that all people have in common. A study was taken asking hundreds of American citizens if they regretted something from their past. Although the majority decided upon failed romantic relationships as their most prominent regret, about sixteen percent stated his or her biggest regrets lied within family matters (Johnson). In James Hurst's short story, “The

Symbols and symbolic language in The Sisters by James Joyce

1656 words - 7 pages James Joyce is not so much a writer as he is a painter of words. His works appear simplistic at first glance, but under scrutiny they reveal the inner world of a character and the reality of the common man through symbols, metaphors, and sensory analysis. Something as simple as "...the sunny side of the street..." can open a whole new door to one of Joyce's plots. For instance, his short story "The Sisters" in the collection The Dubliners

Drugs and Musicians in “Sonny’s Blues” by James Baldwin

876 words - 4 pages When first reading “Sonny’s Blues” by James Baldwin, it may initially seem that the relationship between musicians and drugs is synonymous. Public opinion suggests that musicians and drugs go hand and hand. The possibility lies that Sonny’s passion for jazz music is the underlying reason for his drug use, or even the world of jazz music itself brought drugs into Sonny’s life. The last statement is what the narrator believes to be true. However

Why Nations Fail by Daron Acemogly and James Robinson

2009 words - 8 pages Why Nations Fail by Daron Acemogly and James Robinson stipulates its own answers for questions asked by most who study or engage with development, war and poverty. The central question is – why are some nations strong and others weak? Why are some trapped in perpetual poverty and others thriving in excess? Why do some nations fail while others do not? The authors argue, very basically, that it is “institutions, more precisely the political

Emily Dickinson's Faith and Daisy Miller by Henry James

1144 words - 5 pages spent to long in Geneva, suggesting it may be her background which created her ignorance as to the correct social decorum of Geneva. His instincts allow him to still think kindly of Daisy as very pleasant, but his societal beliefs yet again disallow total acceptance of her behavior: "Certainly she was very charming, but how deucedly sociable!" (331), hinting that her charm is pleasant, and by using the word "but" for contrast, that her social

Open Up and Bleed, by Paul Trynka, Lullaby, by Chuck Palahniuk, and The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger

1257 words - 5 pages In my time as a student, I have come across a myriad of novels, short stories, novella, articles, and the like. Written works are really hard to avoid in life, especially as a teenager in high school. Needless to say, it's hard not to form an opinion on such works. I have come to find many titles that I admire, both fictitious and non, such as Open Up and Bleed by Paul Trynka. There are many more pieces of writing that I merely tolerated, Chuck

Similar Essays

Discipleship: James And Paul Essay

1261 words - 6 pages 2:8-9 is so well received by Christians. The idea of salvation through faith is simple, and doesn’t require a life change. However, once we add Ephesians 2:10 we see that this isn’t the case. James is stating the same idea as Paul did in Ephesians. There are two types of faith, saving faith, and acknowledging faith. One is adequate for salvation and one simply isn’t. In the book, The Complete Book of Discipleship author Bill Hull explains

A Comparison Of Theories Of Social Capital By Pierre Bourdieu And James Coleman

3540 words - 14 pages A Comparison of Theories of Social Capital by Pierre Bourdieu and James Coleman Social capital is a sociological theory which has gained increasing attention in recent years. Whilst Bourdieu can be credited with introducing the term to sociology, it was James Coleman who allowed the concept to gain widespread recognition, highlighting its importance as an individual notion. For Bourdieu social capital forms a part of

Use Of Language And Linguistics In The Poisonwood Bible By Barbara Kingsolver

940 words - 4 pages by the research she must have done into the language's cultural meanings. The linguistics were an integral part of the novel, and unfortunately seemed to fail Kingsolver in the latter half of the novel. The story was meant to convey Kingsolver's beliefs and view of the world around her, however, Ruth May's untimely death seemed to be the climax of the story. Following that, the narrators, Adah, Leah, Rachel, and Orleanna Price, seemed to be mouthpieces that, in their own voice, broadcasted the political and social views of the author. The two halves of the book were as similar as the twins, Leah and Adah. Unlike Adah, the second half of the novel never really revived.

Positiva And Negative Consequences: Whirligig By Paul Fleischman

1593 words - 6 pages Brent, a suicidal killer, is on the journey of his life to pay tribute to the victim's family. In Whirligig by Paul Fleischman, Brent Bishop is an adolescent who has traveled and moved many times, even so much that he knows the way to “fit in” all down to the choice of which ear the earring is placed. But when a socially important party goes astray, he becomes a killer of teenage Lea Zimora of Chicago. He is faced with multiple consequences when