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Persuasive Letter In Support Of Jonathan Swift's "A Modest Proposal"

1139 words - 5 pages

Hersh Patel11 Psalmanazar PlaceJebediah, Idaho 945325 December 2003Samuel S. Smarmy10 Shillings PlaceJebediah, Idaho 94532Respected Mr. Smarmy: You and I, the residents of this auspicious town, share one view in that we pursue the world's finest education for the cerebral development of our promising youth. We supply our beloved children with an eternal array of literary works, which aim to provide facts and techniques that relate to certain fields, such as English, mathematics, or science. Yet, the question arises as to what Jonathan Swift presents, as in a fact or technique, in his morbid essay, "A Modest Proposal", that compels our astute teachers to accept his repulsive work as a part of our children's educational curriculum. You, and even I at one time, felt "mortified" by the literal implication of Swift's "appall[ing]" essay; however, I now present a "modest proposal," that you and I once more explore this text in the same manner that exemplified, to me, the wealth of knowledge actually hidden within this literary creation and which actually awaits to be unearthed by our perspicacious children. At a glance, most readers may ask, what meaning or idea may a student extract from the absurd notion that a "young healthy child is... a most delicious, nourishing, wholesome food"? It is, however, this obvious absurdity and questionability of Swift's writing that obliges the reader, after much thought, to derive the true purpose of this literary work; obviously, no teacher shall accept a work of literature that has no purpose. By this mind set, one may identify that Swift, in his essay "A Modest Proposal" endeavors to expose the inhumanity that exists rampant in Ireland during the seventeenth century through the use of satirical elements. It is necessary to consider the historical era in which Swift composed "A Modest Proposal" prior to further exploration of this melancholic text. I shall, however, employ brevity in my presentation to prevent redundancy and boredom on your behalf. Essentially, the seventeenth century encompasses the age of reasoning and rationalizing, or, in other words, an age in which humans strive for intellectual perfection through ignorance of human emotion. By ignoring the emotional attributes of this essay, such as its morbidity, Swift's composition represents seventeenth century literature, in which an author provides logical explanations and facts that prove a theory or idea; initially, Swift provides facts, such as the population of people within the "kingdom" of Ireland and their "poor" existence: Of the "one million and a half... souls", "an hundred and twenty thousand [are] children of poor parents". From such facts, Swift logically derives his absurd proposal, which mocks the theoretically conceived plans of the emotionless rationalist of that century; Swift evidently employs parody, a technique of satire, by spoofing the prose of rationalists. "I have too long digressed, and therefore...

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