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Philosophy Of David Hume Essay

2065 words - 8 pages

"The human brain starts working the moment you are born and never stops until you stand up to speak in public." –( George Jessel ). One can say or try and dissect the brain and try to figure what’s going on inside of it and that’s what Philosophers today try to accomplish, but a question can be raised from this. Why is that why must the brain be dissected? This question is raised for the simple fact that Philosophers really want to know what’s going on the human brain. This can also go back to “knowing” and believing in something that can be proven as a fact. We will also take a look into induction which is the process of deriving general principles from particular facts or instances, and generalization the act or process of perceiving similarity or relation between different stimuli, as between words, colors, sounds, lights, concepts or feelings; the formation of a general notion Learning a lot this busy semester I have chosen to focus on David Hume and W.K. Clifford Theory. David Hume is a very famous philosopher for the methods that he takes to attack certain objects that he has a strong opinion on. He is the type of philosopher that will attack some of the simple things that we accept as humans and have grown to believe over time. First I’ll start off with David Hume and his outlook on Induction and generalization. Then we will go into W.K. Clifford outlook on beliefs and opinions. . Last but not least I will talk about the Philosophy of life and why it is important to have an outreach like that in life.
As David Hume takes a deeper look into induction and generalization, we see that Induction is basically moving from some type of fact to formulate a specific conclusion about something. Generalization, on the other hand, is making broad assumptions on things usually with insufficient evidence. The main question that he poses is whether inductive reasoning overall can lead one to gain knowledge. The two general problems posed by Hume is how do we, as human beings, form opinions about certain issues that we may or may have not personally observed. The second part of his argument questions various people that have drawn conclusions from something they haven’t seen. In the article, Hume rarely refers to this particular issue as induction; he uses the term generalization a lot to discuss the topic.

This issue has been around for a very long time looking back into our world’s storied history. We look at our observations in the past to sometimes speculate things that we will see in the future. For example, all of our life’s we have only seen one particular type of species of squirrels. This is the typical brown squirrel that one would see on a daily basis. Everywhere and every time someone mentions a squirrel you would envision something brown. You wouldn’t think that it was any way possible for there to be another type/color squirrel. This “assumption” was believed to be true for a long time until someone discovered a black...

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