Philosophy Of The Mind Essay

1443 words - 6 pages

Philosophy of Mind
One can say or try and dissect the brain and try to figure what’s going on inside of it and that’s what Philophers today try to do that. Why is that why must the brain be dissected? This question is raised for the simple fact that Philophers really want to know why whats going on the human brain. This can also go back to “knowing” and believing in something. We will also take a look into emotion with a emphisis on facil expressions. Reading the human face could be a difficult task. Last but not least I will talk about the Philosphy of life and why it is important to have an outreach like that in life, futhermore this has an emphese on belief. Learning a lot this busy semester the topics above will be though out and discussed so that we can get a better understand of each of them.
David Hume is a very famous philosopher for the methods that he takes to attack certain objects that he has a strong opinion on. He is the type of philosopher that will attack some of the simple things that we accept as humans and have grown to believe over time. He questions the validity of these arguments in regards to the methods that one took to arrive at their desired conclusions. He most notably takes a deeper look into induction and generalization. Induction is basically moving from some type of fact to formulate a specific conclusion about something. Generalization, on the other hand, is making broad assumptions on things usually with insufficient evidence. These two distinct points are the basis of David Hume’s argument expressed in, “An Inquiry Concerning Human Understanding.” The main question that he poses is whether inductive reasoning overall can lead one to gain knowledge.

The two general problems posed by Hume is how do we, as human beings, form opinions about certain issues that we may or may have not personally observed. The second part of his argument questions various people that have drawn conclusions from something they haven’t seen. In the article, Hume rarely refers to this particular issue as induction; he uses the term generalization a lot to discuss the topic.

This issue has been around for a very long time looking back into our world’s storied history. We look at our observations in the past to sometimes speculate things that we will see in the future. For example, all of one’s life they have only seen one particular type of species of squirrels. This is the typical brown squirrel that one would see on a daily basis. Everywhere and every time someone mentions a squirrel you would envision something brown. You wouldn’t think that it was any way possible for there to be another type/color squirrel. This assumption was believed to be true for a long time until someone discovered a black squirrel and also a gray squirrel which proved those initial thoughts to be invalid. Another great point that arises from Hume is that all events in the future will be as they were in the past. This idea is only...

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