Philosophy In The Romantic Era Essay

830 words - 4 pages

William Wordsworth is a poet and a philosopher. In his poem Nutting he uses a

vast variety of poetic devices. Some are imagery, alliteration, and enjambment, which is the

continuation of a sentence over a line-break. Wordsworth is associated with Coleridge and

Southey, all of which are romantic poets in the “Lake Poets” group. Percy Bysshe Shelley is also

from England, he was a part of the “Satanic School.”

Shelley and Wordsworth are alike and differ in many ways. Shelley agrees with

Wordsworth that there is a Great Spirit or power that has animated the world that we live, a power

with purpose and presence. Shelley differs from Wordsworth in what they think of the power

Shelley finds the power distant.

The spirit comes and departs, and without it, nature is not enough for us. Nature can

actually be an enemy, according to Shelly. Wordsworth was a poet of nature and man. He used

the word nature to symbolize the unexplainable, unknowable over soul that human hearts want to

know. To Shelly, nature is valuable to us because though it, we can feel the power that lies beyond

it. Nature leads us to greater things, thinking it is because of nature leads to failure. As Shelly grew

older he began to demand more of poetry and of himself then Wordsworth did.

Nutting by Wordsworth is a poem written narratively. It is about a boy who

recollects an occurrence of pleasure and reflection. He went into the woods to gather nuts. At the

end of the poem we see that he is actually addressing a silent listener, a girl, showing that the

poem is a gentle lesson for the girl. When the speaker of the poem is walking in the woods, he

stumbles upon a like place that is amazing and perfect, seemed as though it was never touched.

He is so surprised and the place is so beautiful that he starts to pick the white flowers from the

plants realizing that because of what he has done, the seen will never look the same again. The

speaker does feel guilty about what he has done. Looking back he almost regrets what he did, “I

felt a sense of pain…” (Wordsworth 51). Here this poem relates to a story in The Bible about Lot’s

wife. Lot and his family are leaving their home in Sodom right before the city falls to destruction.

Travelling out of the town Lot’s wife looked back at her home and turned into a pillar of salt. Both

Lot’s wife and...

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