Philosphers And Theories Essay

928 words - 4 pages

Two Great Philosophers and their Principal Theories

Sigmund Schlomo Freud was an Austrian neurologist born on May 06, 1856. Freud is know as the father of psychoanalysis, his theories of the unconscious mind and repression. Freud created the clinical method of psychoanalysis to investigate and treat psychopathology. Freud understood the workings of the human brain. He was intrigued by it, I believe that was one of the reasons he was a neurologist. Freud came from a poor family of eight children and he was favored over his other siblings the most. His parents sacrificed for his education regardless of being poor. Freud went to a preteigous high school and graduated with honors.
Freud studied under great philosopher’s, Darwinist Prof and Karl Claus at the medical University of Vienna. Freud admired many philosopher of his time, but brought Fredrich Nietzsche collected works when he passed away only to read not study, basically to put his beliefs and spins on Nietzsche. Freud went on a traveling fellowship to Paris to study with the most sought after neurologist, St. Jean-Martin Charcott. Jean Martin Charcott was studying hypnosis to cure mental illness. Hypnosis was not something Freud admired, and this experience turned his career towards the “school of thought”. Freud opened his own medical practice, for neurology and also married. Freud was well know for a patient named Anna “O”, who inspired the psychoanalytic “talking cure”. The talking cure is still used this day as the basis of psychoanalysis. Many psychologist during Freud's early studies, felt the talking cure method was stupid and that it did not cure patient's, but Freud through his research brought repressed thought's and feelings into consciousness in order to free the patient from suffering repetitive distorted emotions. Of, course it makes so, much sense today, because the human mind can encounter something traumatic and repress the trauma, but through psychoanalysis encouraging patients to be more open of the unconscious thoughts and feelings, it can be achieved.
Freud is also know for psycho sexual development meaning the sexual etiology of the brain (neuroses). Freud believed there were stages in life as a person matures into adult sexuality. Freud was also on to something, he believed before the 1890's that childhood sexual abuse were a cause's for the emotional and mental state of mind, but rejected that theory, but Freud was right. Later in life Freud discussed the psyche of the human mind, and how it can be divided into three parts: Id, ego, and super-ego. Id is the impulsiveness of a person the “pleasure principle”. Ego means from Freud's opinion; the pursuit for an insatiable need for pleasure (Id), which can get you in trouble and, therefore the Id divide’s itself into ego and superego. Sigmund Freud was very famous, because of his...

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