Piano Music Essay

549 words - 2 pages

The beautiful sound of piano music has captured the hearts of people since the early eighteenth century. Since then, many musicians have dedicated their lives to this instrument. Some players even play piano so well that it may seem that this instrument is easy to play. However, to be able to play the piano well isn’t easy; it takes a lot of skill. To become a good piano player, one must love music very much, have good finger techniques, and body flexibility.

To become a good piano player, one must love music. The love of music can help you truly understand the music you play, so that you can play it well. For example, when you play a piece of music on the piano, not only must you get the notes and the rhythm right, you must also be able to put feeling into the music to make it come alive. In addition, the love for music can help you grab the attention of your audience by playing the piano with a large range of dynamic contrast (loud or soft). If you play the music with little dynamic contrast, your audience would surely fall asleep. Lastly, the love for music can help you express you own feelings in the music you play; and can thereby capture the hearts of your audience. To be able to play piano well, one must love music very much.

In order to become a good pianist, one must have good finger techniques. With good finger techniques, one will be able to play fast music. Because some music should be played quickly, this can help you play through the music without getting stuck. Good...

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