"Pigs In Heaven" By Barbara Kingsolver.

838 words - 3 pages

Pigs in Heaven"It has to do with our mythology in his country ... that if you are smart enough and work hard enough, you will make it. It allows us to perpetuate this huge gulf between the well off and the desperately poor. If you fall through the cracks you must be stupid or lazy or both. It's a trap because poverty is viewed as shameful. In this culture, it's more honorable to steal then to beg." This quote is from Barbara Kingsolver on what she thinks the theme is for her novel, Pigs in Heaven. Many critics approve of what she says and writes and others do not. Of these many critics, three critics gave more noticeable reviews for the novel. Rhoda Koenig, Karen Karbo, and Laura Shapiro, all gave Pigs in Heaven by Barbara Kingsolver, positive and negative reviews.First, Rhoda Koenig offers a negative assessment of Pigs in Heaven, faulting the novel's political implications and reliance on tidy resolutions. She says that television seems to provide not only the motor for Kingsolver's plot but the tone of her characterization and prose. Alice lets the television her relationship with Cash because of his addiction to it. The Oprah incident did not add much suspense to the plot and only caused disaster for the characters. Koenig also says that the prevailing coziness dissolves and chance of suspense. The characters in this book are all so nice and kind that there is chance for adventure or suspense. Interesting plot does not consist of kind and cozy characters. There are many problems and situations in this novel, but there is always a "happy ending" to everything. Koenig states "Pigs in Heaven introduces a number of serious problems, then resolves them with a dopey benignity and a handful of fairy dust." Obviously, Rhoda Koenig did not enjoy Pigs in Heaven, and with her review she has a reason for not appreciating Kingsolver's novel.Second, Karen Karbo took pleasure in reading the novel, and she praises Kingsolver's blending of political commentary and emotional insight in her review. She likes how Kingsolver mixes Cherokee heritage with the American society. She shows how Kingsolver used the Cherokee Nation to remind people about the Native American heritage. Karbo states "... visions of the long suffering Cherokee who knows the value of kith, kin, sacrifice, and every other noble thing missing in American society trudged through my head." From Karbo's review, one can assume that she enjoyed Kingsolvers's use of...

Find Another Essay On "Pigs in Heaven" by Barbara Kingsolver.

Use of language and linguistics in The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver

940 words - 4 pages While reading The Poisonwood Bible, I was fascinated by Kingsolver's extensive use of Lingala, the language used in the region of the Congo where the Price family lives. Lingala is a language in which each word has several meanings, and Kingsolver has the characters in the story use language to reflect themselves. Kingsolver also masterfully wields words to connote subtle ideas throughout the novel.Throughout the novel are sprinkled many phrases

Stone Soup an Essay Written by Barbara Kingsolver

2081 words - 8 pages draws a tangent to the toy’s intended message. In her essay “Stone Soup”, Barbara Kingsolver focuses on this concept of “Familiy-of-Dolls Family Values” (“Stone Soup” 275) and how it contrasts with her own family; she sheds light on society’s association of negative connotations with families not of the norm. As Kingsolver comes to learn, the act of trying to justify to the exclusively ‘stereotypical family’ supporters that there exist special

Change of Perspective from City Life to Country Life based on American Earth by Barbara Kingsolver

734 words - 3 pages and bustle involved in such a life can cause. Our instinctual desire for open expanses of wild land still remains, and with the building stress that has come to define society the need for the settling presence of nature has never been higher. Barbara Kingsolver explains and demonstrates her concern for this in an excerpt of her writing found in “American Earth.” The most important thought that I feel that she expressed was the fact that too many

"The Bean Trees" by Barbara Kingsolver; "An Instant Bond"; Reflection upon relationships within the book

506 words - 2 pages hometowns in Kentucky were separated by only two counties, and that we had both been to the exact same Bob Segar concert ad the Kentucky State fair my senior year" (96 Kingsolver). They were so close, and so similar, this was not a big surprise. Lou Ann even points out a physical similarity. "It's been so long...You talk just like me" (102 Kingsolver). They had the same habits of run-on sentences and southern colloquial English. They could speak to each

Themes of "The Bean Trees" by Barbara Kingsolver: Family, Society unjustices, and people maturing

864 words - 3 pages Themes are the fundamental and universal ideas explored in a literary work. Throughout the novel "The Bean Trees" the author Barbara Kingsolver used several themes to get her points across. The opening theme in this novel is the framework of a true family. Another theme that is prevalent in the course of the novel is how society unrightfully judges and takes advantage of weaker people. The concluding theme in the novel is how characters progress

The Poisonwood Bible, by Barbara Kingsolver

1190 words - 5 pages no room for the opinions and beliefs of others. Nathan was a soldier in World War II and was able to escape from his almost death. Viewing himself as a coward, an element he believes God hates. He then decided that he will never be a coward again and he will not fail his God by being a coward. For this reason he vowed that he will never be a coward again and he would not run away from any situation that threatens his life. With this idea in

How heaven is depicted in Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold

714 words - 3 pages shouldn't be any explanation for it, "I didn't question that a high school had swing sets: that's just what made it heaven"(Sebold 17). Holly and Susie help each other through the different stages with the aid of Franny by their sides. Heaven fulfilled their simplest dreams at first and the two girls had to learn what they wanted and how to use it.Susie had to learn to adapt to life in heaven. There was no way of ever going back to earth and she had her

The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom

1354 words - 6 pages Many Forms of Sacrifice Sacrifice, as we know it, is something we give up for the sake of a better cause. When we care about something or someone, we willingly and sometimes unknowingly act on selflessness. In the book, The Five People You Meet in Heaven, written by Mitch Albom, the main character, Eddie, dies only to have five encounters that shine a spotlight on his life. In the process of learning why he meets these people, each character

Analysis of Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting by in America by Barbara Ehrenreich

2905 words - 12 pages poor cannot really live without the rich, and vice versa. But Barbara believes the two can no longer coexist. It is interesting because this is essentially the opposite outcome predicted by trickle-down economics – the idea that tax breaks for the wealthy would essentially, in a roundabout way, help the poor since the upper class will spend and thus circulate more money. I would have thought that a better economy would yield higher pay, though I

Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America, by Barbara Ehrenreich

1331 words - 6 pages The author Barbara Ehrenreich is a journalist, who decided to write an article on how it was to live on minimum wage. She stopped her life and began a series of trips across country to gain information for her article, Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America. Barbara Ehrenreich, started her socioeconomic experiment in Key West, Florida. Her initial effort is to secure a place to live and a job that will support her. In the beginning

Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By In America, by Barbara Ehrenreich

790 words - 3 pages In her book, Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America (2001), Barbara Ehrenreich performs a social experiment in which she transplants herself from her comfortable middle-class life and immersing herself in the plight of the “millions of American’s (who) work full-time, year-round, for poverty-level wages” (Ehrenreich, 2001). Her goal was to explore the consequences of the welfare reform on the approximately four million women who would

Similar Essays

High Tide In Tucson By Barbara Kingsolver

741 words - 3 pages Writing Review - High Tide In TucsonIn High Tide In Tucson, Barbara Kingsolver touches on many aspects of living and the nuances that make life worth living. Her series of essays depict many situations found in life with a new light of clarity. In her essays, she is able to draw from her experiences to teach others the many life lessons that she has learned. Since all the essays involve narratives in her eyes, the reader is able to grasp the

The Lacuna By Barbara Kingsolver Essay

1570 words - 6 pages Shepard goes through many struggles, but grows into an intelligent and successful individual. Had he given up on his life when times were tough he would not have been able to have as many accomplishments as he did. Based on this information, the main theme is persistence is imperative in order to achieve one’s goals, Harrison knew that in order to be successful; he had to just keep casting his line, until he finally reeled in his fish and conquered his own hunger for success. Works Cited Kingsolver, Barbara. The Lacuna: A Novel. New York; Ontario: Harper, 2009. Print.

Transformations In "The Bean Trees" By Barbara Kingsolver

1474 words - 6 pages When thinking of birds, visualizing them building their nests in cacti certainly isn't the first thing that comes to mind. In the book, The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver, metaphorically everyone is constantly building their nests in cacti, and evolving from their experiences. From living in attics to taking trips across the country with no destination, characters in this book don't live what society considers the “conventional American

The Poisonwood Bible By Barbara Kingsolver

1786 words - 7 pages belief that language is a valuable tool, used by everyone- and in so many varying ways. Kingsolver effectively explores the breakdown of language in the event of pain (the village women squalling at their children’s death), and the importance of language to understanding deeper issues (Nathan’s confusion with bangala). The Poisonwood Bible teaches readers to become aware of not only other cultures in general, but especially their language, their