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Plato And Aristotle: Their Contributions To The Development Of Western Philosophy

604 words - 2 pages

The philosophies of Plato and Aristotle and their contributions to the development of western philosophy.

Plato was a classical Greek philosopher and one of the top 5 contributors to Western philosophy, educator after his mentor, Socrates and teacher of Aristotle. His sophistication as a writer started while under the tutelage of Socrates, continued through his establishing of his own academy, (The Academy of Athens which has been labeled as the first institution of higher learning in the Western World) and throughout his many years as an open minded author. Many of his works in early adulthood displayed his willingness to ask questions of any type, no preference to scope, difficulty withstanding, political and intellectual current issues.

Plato had such an authentic feature to his writings that made him so much more distinctive among any other of the great philosophers and that literary way stands alone but has been referred to many of his contemporaries and close followers through the centuries. That specific style is the “dialogue” form, not as many of the other brilliant men of his time would see it as being based from the literary drama but using factual settings, depictions, and exchanges these would be philosophical discussions or narratives. Not only do his topics vary widely, the speakers vary also and the most intriguing part of each dialogue is what role will the questions and answers change to in each of those writings.
Plato’s Republic is a sprawling, detailed and extremely wide ranging influence that concerned the definition of justice and the order and character of the “just city” and the “just man”. The impact of these writings are factual, intellectual, ethical and historical through the centuries, Western philosophy is still influenced into the 21st century and will continue to be.

Aristotle was a Greek philosopher and one of the top 5 contributors to Western philosophy, gifted student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the...

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