This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Plato's Divided Line Of Being And Knowing

529 words - 2 pages

Plato's divided line theory illustrates the distinction between the different levels of knowledge and reality. This theory asks us to imagine a vertical line. The left half is dedicated to metaphysics (the study of being), and the right half is dedicated to epistemology (the study of knowing). Now imagine a horizontal line running through the middle of the vertical line, to form quadrants. The upper left quadrant represents the intelligible world of being which is invisible, eternal, unchanging, indivisible, and immaterial. The lower left quadrant represents the visible world of becoming, which is visible, temporal, changing, divisible and material. The upper right quadrant represents knowledge (knowing is the state of mind dependant upon being). The lower right quadrant represents opinion.Next, we must imagine segments on the vertical line from lowest (D) to highest (A). On the left (being) side, the segments are degrees of reality, and on the right (knowing) side the segments are degrees of certainty or clarity. The lowest level (D) represents illusions in the visible world of becoming quadrant on the being side. (D) Represents imagination in the opinion quadrant on the knowing side. At this level we tend to carry illusions and form opinions based on shadows, images, reflections, pictures, fantasies, etc.Ascending to the next level (C), we have belief in the visible world of becoming quadrant on the being side, and perception in the opinion quadrant on the knowing side. At this level, we actually perceive the objects themselves unlike imagination where we observe reflections, pictures...

Find Another Essay On Plato's Divided Line of Being and Knowing

Plato's Concept of Democracy and Justice

835 words - 3 pages Book one of Plato's Republic examines the concept of democracy and justice. Thrasymachus, the Sophist declares that justice is the advantage of the stronger, whereas Socrates argues that justice is wisdom, something good and desirable. According to this in Athenian times, a democracy could not survive with out a system of justice in place. This still holds true in the contemporary Western world. Throughout the dialogue of book one, Socrates

Wuthering Heights and Frankenstein - Theme of the divided self

3435 words - 14 pages needing Heathcliff as whatever their "souls are made of" they "are the same." Without him, Catherine considers herself a mere shadow of her former self, wishing to be a "girl again, half savage."Within Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein,' the divisional aspect of the two principal characters, Frankenstein and the monster, rather subvert the theme of being physically divided. Mary Shelley presents this theme through her use of juxtaposition when

Describe and Discuss One or More Explanations of Divided Attention

1280 words - 5 pages Divided attention refers to the ability to divide ones attention between two or more tasks. The focused attention models explain how all our inputs are focused on one task at any one time, however it is clear from looking at everyday life that we are able to divide our attention, successfully being able to complete more than one task at the same time. There are two main explanations of divided attention, one is the modular theories and the one I

Reason as a Way of Knowing and Thinking

1336 words - 6 pages Reason as a way of knowing denotes constructing meaning by modifying and justifying ideas and beliefs based on new or existing information. The term logic, meaning deriving from the use of valid information, is used synonymously with reason, and is recognized as a branch of reasoning. Reason is a way of thinking and the word logic describes the way reasoning follows certain rules and standards. When making a claim to knowledge, coherent reason

Descartes and Knowing with Certainty of God's Existence

1075 words - 4 pages Descartes and Knowing with Certainty of God's Existence Descartes, Pascal, and the Rationalist Credo Pascal asserts that we can know only by the heart, whereas Descartes would have us believe through his truths that we can know with certainty of Gods existence. The factors that go into their views on reason will be compared and accented within this essay. The order of the universe is knowable to Descartes. He proves these by using

History and Benefits of the Assembly Line

3659 words - 15 pages ., 2011). Designing and configuring assembly lines in modern era requires high capital investments, thus has attracted the attention of researchers, to solve assembly lines’ problem and optimize its efficiency in terms of productivity and cost (Boysen et al., 2006). 1.1 Background of the Study There are many types of assembly line that are being designed and implemented in modern manufacturing. The designs of line vary widely according to the

Plato - "The Republic" - Explain and Evaluate Plato's theory of knowledge

1148 words - 5 pages Plato's triangular theory of knowledge expounded in "The Republic" has acted as one of the most important contributions in philosophical history - particularly to the field of epistemology. Plato uses three powerful metaphors to explain what knowledge and goodness are: The simile of the sun, the image of the divided line, and the most famous of all, the allegory of the cave. The study of epistemology is primarily concerned with what knowledge is

Compare and contrast knowing a friend to knowing how to swim, knowing a scientific theory and knowing a historical period. What conclusions about the nature of knowledge can you reach?

1423 words - 6 pages We can compare many things and people only by each quality. Contrasting them with their qualities will be at the same time easy and hard. Comparing a friend with something that is not alive, like knowing how to swim are two different things. A friend for example is a human being as everybody, who will help you anytime you want, give you support, understand and love you. According to Jane Sequichie Hifler, "In every man there is something wherein

Plato's Allegory of the Cave and Perceptions of Reality

1137 words - 5 pages The basic premise of Plato’s allegory of the cave is to depict the nature of the human being, where true reality is hidden, false images and information are perceive as reality. In the allegory Plato tells a story of a man who is put on a Gnostics path. Prisoners seating in a cave with their legs and necks chained down since childhood. They are chained in such a way that they cannot move or see each other, only look into the shadows on the wall

A Critical Analysis of Plato's and Sartre's Views on Existence

2480 words - 10 pages A CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF PLATO’S AND SARTRE’S VIEWS ON EXISTENCE Introduction In order to understand the meaning of existence in relation to philosophy, we need to discuss its ordinary meaning and the various levels of existence. The Chambers Concise Dictionary (1992, 362) defines ‘exist’ as having an actual being; to live; to occur; to continue to live’ and it defines existence as ‘the state of existing or being’. In other words, the

Article Review A House and Senate Divided: The Clinton Legacy and Congressional Elections of 2000

583 words - 2 pages time in the making, but finally reared its head after the decision by the Supreme Court had been made. With the House and Senate being very nearly evenly divided, it would be difficult for Bush and Chaney to make a productive Congress as opposed to the cumbersome legislative stalemate.

Similar Essays

Aristotle's Approach To Ethics And Plato's Divided Line

780 words - 3 pages Aristotle's Approach to Ethics and Plato's Divided Line I. PLATO 3) Explain the so-called ‘Divided Line’. What do the different levels mean? How does this apply to ethics? How does this apply to Knowledge, perception, and/or awareness? Explain in depth and detail. Plato’s ‘Divided Line’ is a model indicating not only levels of knowledge, but basically levels of everything. It is divided into four levels and two sides. The

How The Divided Line Relates With The Cave And The Light Of The Sun

1386 words - 6 pages In one of Plato’s most famous three analogies, that of the divided line, which was perfectly, rather clarified in the book The Republic. It is one of the most articulate stories. Plato brought out these models of truth, knowledge, and the natural world of truth along his analogy of the divided line. However, Plato’s analogies are over 1900 years old, I believe but they can still play a big role in today’s world. Plato believes that his manner of

Glaucon's Challenge And Plato's Theory Of Justice In Plato's Republic

1939 words - 8 pages consequences. Glaucon presents that, “The best is to do injustice without paying the penalty, the worst is to suffer it without being able to take revenge. Justice is a mean between these two extremes” (Plato, Republic 359a). Therefore, it is common nature to come to an agreement neither to commit nor suffer injustice and laws are created accordingly. His second case is made in the story of the ring of Gyges, which illustrates a situation

Comparison And Conclusions About The Nature Of Knowledge Between Knowing A Friend And Knowing How To Swim, Knowing A Scientific Theory And Knowing A Historical Period

1037 words - 4 pages We can compare many things and people only by each quality. Contrasting them with their qualities will be at the same time easy and hard. Comparing a friend with something that is not alive, like knowing how to swim are two different things. A friend for example is a human being as everybody, who will help you anytime you want, give you support, understand and love you. According to Jane Sequichie Hifler, "In every man there is something wherein