Poetry Comparison Of The Isles Of Scilly And At The British War Cemetery, Bayeux

1778 words - 7 pages

Poetry Comparison of The Isles of Scilly and At the British War Cemetery, Bayeux

The two poems express grieving for the dead, and both use similar
language in some respects in their use of metaphors and language and
are very emotional in their content in order to convey the feeling of
grief for the large numbers of dead appropriately. Curiously, for two
such emotional poems, they both bear very nonchalant and almost
clinical titles, both simply naming the place that the poem is about
which clearly in no way indicates the emotional content of the poem,
seemingly fulfilling no real purpose other than to be strangely
ironic.
In At the British war cemetery, Bayeux, Charles Causley writes about
the 'five thousand' dead, buried at the cemetery that the title
indicates. The poem has a very ordered structure echoing the
structured and orderly lines upon lines of graves and gravestones at a
war cemetery supported later by referring to the dead as in 'geometry'
of sleep. Grigson's poem, however, is much less straightforward and
uses a combination of enjambment and a general feeling of
unorderliness in his layout of the poem to convey the feeling of
untidiness about the weatherworn and shipwreck-scattered shores of the
Scilly Isles.
Causley writes in first person, speaking, presumably as himself about
his experience at the war cemetery in Bayeux. It has clearly had a
profound impact on him and makes sure that he is writing about the
dead themselves, referring to the graves as not just graves but
'their…graves'. He suggests that he feels guilty walking among them as
a living person, because he has got life while they have not. He
considers life as a possession that one can own and even give as a
gift if he so wanted. In a biblical reference, he compares himself to
Jesus walking among the five thousand, (which is, of course the number
of dead he claims are buried there at the start of the poem) and holds
the bread and fish from them in 'iron hands'. He is unable to
distribute his gift, life, as Jesus was able to distribute the bread
and fish among the five thousand in the bible, and he feels guilt for
this.
He notices that the graves are under fir and chestnut trees, as well
as being among lavender and marguerite; both typically English plants
which 'forge' for him a sky which he considers to be English as
beneath it everything is so English in essence.
The feeling that when he speaks, he is addressing the dead themselves
is confirmed when he asks them to 'turn now' and rise to read their
'rank of snow' on their own tombstone, referring to the graves'
snow-like appearance on the ground when viewing such a large number of
the smart white tombstones.
Before leaving, the idea of his apparent guilt for having what the
dead have not is revived when in the penultimate stanza he asks
...

Find Another Essay On Poetry Comparison of The Isles of Scilly and At the British War Cemetery, Bayeux

What factors drew people away from the British Isles and towards the New World? Did the attractions of the New World live up to their promise?

2268 words - 9 pages It can be shown that large numbers of people decided to venture from the British Isles in the 1600s to colonise the new settlements in Virginia, in most cases believing that they would be bettering their position in life. They used their skills to work a new land where they would eventually (if an indentured servant) be able to own their own piece of land, an amount of typically fifty acres, and if a stockholder of the Virginia Company or not an

THE WAR OF 1812 CEMETERY: THE LETHAL THREAT TO FIELD SOLDIERS

1734 words - 7 pages interned at a cemetery located nearby along Aero Road. The cemetery is now simply known as the War of 1812 Cemetery. In examining the causes of death of the soldiers buried at the War of 1812 Cemetery, it is evident that the greatest threat to American forces during this campaign was not the British bayonet, musket, or field artillery piece; it was simply living in the camp itself. Infirmities most Americans today would view as non-fatal

The Tradition Of War Poetry

3576 words - 14 pages express exactly how they are feeling at that moment. Poetry is one of the most powerful means of communication that uses words very sparingly, and often defines the era in which the poet lived and died. I think that is why many poems are written about war, as anyone who was involved in that experience would obviously have strong views and opinions about their encounters, which they would wish to express. This essay

The Pride of Blue Springs: The Blue Springs Cemetery

2144 words - 9 pages An unmistakable crisp smell of fall hangs in the air. The old, iron fence gives a safe feeling, as the sound of gravel sounds under visitors’ shoes. Surprisingly, this is the typical setting of the Blue Springs Cemetery. The cemetery not only serves to house deceased loved ones, but also serves as a symbol of pride to the Blue Springs and surrounding community. The Blue Springs Cemetery, a Gage County Landmark, has a rich history and is an

The Pride of Blue Springs: The Blue Springs Cemetery

2152 words - 9 pages An unmistakable crisp smell of fall hangs in the air. The old, iron fence can be seen by anybody on the road, as the sound of gravel sounds under visitors’ shoes. People can feel a strange sense of peace and calmness as they look at loved ones. Surprisingly this is the typical setting of the Blue Springs Cemetery. The cemetery not only serves to contain deceased loved ones, but also as a symbol of pride to the Blue Springs and surrounding

Evacuation of British Children From Britain's Major Cities at the Beginning of World War II

693 words - 3 pages Evacuation of British Children From Britain's Major Cities at the Beginning of World War II The British government had many reasons for evacuating children from Britain's major cities at the start to of the Second World War. The prime objective of the evacuation was to save the children from being killed by German bombing raids. The government feared that air attacks on main cities were very close, and they wanted the

British Policy of Appeasement at the Beginning of World War Two

1367 words - 5 pages British Policy of Appeasement at the Beginning of World War Two The First World War was the beginning of a new era in fighting. Weapons and fighting technique had drastically changed, making war much more dangerous. With the predictions for the new weapons including poisonous gas and bigger bombs, Great Britain was very much afraid for its citizens, especially men and women of fighting age. The country wished to avoid war at any cost. The

Post War Soldier And Civilian Expectations Of The British Government

1439 words - 6 pages of their wartime trade, particularly women. The expectation that men and their families, who had fought in the war, would be looked after by the government through pensions was overwhelming and political support was crucial to this issue.Understanding of the emotional pain of World War I was important to the British soldiers and expectations of their government at the time of demobilization to do this were unfulfilled. The process of

The Effect of World War I on British People at Home

4266 words - 17 pages The Effect of World War I on British People at Home Throughout the First World War people’s lives back home in Britain were greatly affected. Britain’s Army relied upon an entirely voluntary service and with many joining up the loss of male members to the community greatly affected everyone’s lives. With the men gone, many jobs were left open and for the first time women were allowed some independence as they took

The Involvement of War in British Literature

1217 words - 5 pages direct opposition to Michael’s counsel not to imagine the battle between good and evil as a duel, and it also contradicts the narrative priorities that Milton himself lays out at the beginning of Book 9” (Johnson 213). This passage in Johnson’s article explains that Milton intentions of creating the epic poem were the war between good and evil, God and Satan. “Which returns us to Empson’s complaint about Raphael’s responsibility for the Fall

The Reality of War in Various Poetry

1828 words - 7 pages The Reality of War in Various Poetry Works Cited Missing The First World War was unlike any previous was Britain had ever fought. The horror of both the physical conditions and the reality of battle moved soldier and officer alike to express their reactions in verse. The soldiers' shock at the contrast between their experiences

Similar Essays

"The Address Delivered At The Dedication Of The Cemetery At Gettysburg" And "Pericles's Funeral Oration" Compared And Contrasted

865 words - 4 pages fight for freedom. “We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that this nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.” (“The Address Delivered at the Dedication of the Cemetery at Gettysburg”, paragraph 2, lines 2-4) It says that they are met on a great battle field, and that they have come to dedicate

The Evolution Of British Poetry Essay

910 words - 4 pages The Evolution of British Poetry      Throughout the literary history of the Renaissance, a gradual but dramatic change in the poetic style of the time becomes apparent. From one contribution to another, the rebellion between the poetic styles is evident. Early Elizabethan and Jacobean poetry demonstrates the love that mankind shares and the universal truths that the people of that time held so dear. On through the

Analysis Of Chapter 1, "Society And Economic Life" ( Martin Daunton) From The "Short Oxford History Of The British Isles The Nineteenth Nentury", Edited By Colin Matthew

1013 words - 4 pages Parliament, changes in the poor law and monetary reforms helped to raise the standard of peoples lives. It also changed due to the alteration of the peoples perception of what was expected of them and also what they expected from society and led to a state of mind of self help and self sufficiency, allowing them to rise up the social ladder and better themselves by the century's end.Bibliography:Matthew, Colin, short Oxford history of the British Isles: the nineteenth century, Oxford, Oxford university press, 2000

The Jewish Cemetery In Victoria, British Columbia

1281 words - 6 pages Introduction The Jewish cemetery in Victoria, British Columbia, is located on the corner of Cedar Hill Road and Fernwood. This historical cemetery remains active within the Jewish community. It was consecrated in 1860, and the first burial was conducted on March 20, 1861. The individual buried was murder victim Morris Price. In 2012, the cemetery was victimized by vandalism, which resulted in the destruction of multiple gravestones. Since