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Police Officers’ Right To Privacy Essay

769 words - 4 pages

Releasing information about police officers is an important discussion between law enforcement and the media. Over the years, is been argued whether police should have the right of privacy, or their personnel information made public. This information can contain officer’s identity and private files. Should the officers’ information be release? In what situations should law enforcement have a right to privacy? Several articles in the document “Police Officers’ Right to Privacy” exemplify the court rulings and legislative actions regarding the matters of officers’ information being release.
There have been several court rulings and legislative actions concerning the release of the different forms of officer information. Judge James C. Chalfant of Los Angeles County Superior Court ruled that there is public interest in knowing the officers information in cases where officers fire a weapon. The judge stated that since the officers’ names are not shield as personnel documentation, “The Times” had the right to know the names. The Long Beach Police union President was worried about the release of officers’ names. Law enforcement officer from all over California argue that releasing the information of misbehave officers’ to the public, would put the officers’ life and family at risk. Due to their arguments, lawmakers took legislative action and destroyed a bill that made available the admission to disciplinary records. Judge Patrick T. Madden of Los Angeles County Superior Court ruled that the police should not keep secret the information of the officers and if they will do so, they will have to justify the reason why. The Judge also declared that evidence be provided on occasions where there has been a risk or danger when the officers’ information has been release. The police officers and their attorneys have fail to provide evidence on occasions or cases where an officers life was put into jeopardy or an officer was harm due to the public having access to their personnel information. Law enforcement agencies and the union have tried to appeal many of the court rulings and legislative actions regarding the release of officers’ information, but most of the time the judges have rejected the appeals.
The media and police have made many arguments for the release of different forms of officer information. The media argues that is policy for the law enforcement to release...

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