Popular Music In The United States: Rap

738 words - 3 pages

Popular in the united states, the rhythmic music known as rap can be traced back generations to it’s ethnic origins. Centuries before hip hop music existed, the Tribes of West Africa were delivering stories rhythmically, over drums and sparse instrumentation. Connections between tribal story telling virtuals and rap music have been acknowledged by many modern day "tribes", spoken word artists, mainstream news sources, and academics. In the 21st century, rappers rap about their lives and how the place they grew up in was very hard and that is why many people think like rap music so much, because there are many connections rapper can relate to.

Many people do not like rap music because ...view middle of the document...

When i listen to rap I get very relaxed and it sometimes turns into my happy place and many people who listen to rap can relate to what im saying. Not all rap music is sad or about drugs, money, and women. The kind of rap i listen to i kind of trash talk such as Kendrick Lamars control verse, saying

“Bout who's the best MC? Kendrick, Jigga and Nas

Eminem, Andre 3000, the rest of y'all

New n!%%@s just new n!%%@s, don't get involved”

Giving his respect to the older rappers who he truly gives respect to for bringing the rap game to the real world and making it a very controversial music genre. He also says

“But this is hip hop and them n!%%@s should know what time it is

And that goes for Jermaine Cole, Big KRIT, Wale

Pusha T, Meek Millz, A$AP Rocky, Drake

Fowler

Big Sean, Jay Electron', Tyler, Mac Miller

I got love for you all but I'm tryna murder you n!%%@s

Tryna make sure your core fans never heard of you n!%%@s

They don't wanna hear not one more noun or verb from you n!%%@s

What is...

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