Population And Illegal Immigration In The United States

1974 words - 8 pages

During the first 2 million years of the United States’ history, the human population was a minor element in the world ecosystem, with at most 10 million members. One Hundred thousand years ago, with the dawning of the Stone Age, the number of human beings began to increase more rapidly. The relative balance before these times gave way when the human population developed methods of agriculture and animal breeding. This enabled them to stay in one location upon the earth instead of searching for food.
     Population growth during the 20th century was notably rapid. In 1994, the total world population was estimated at about 5.6 billion people. It increased nearly 4 billion people during the 20th century. The most significant world trend shows that death rates are currently decreasing due to recent technology, allowing people to live longer and better. However, the birth rates are increasing in poor countries, and decreasing in wealthy nations, causing the population to increase. “Eighty-eight percent of the world’s population takes place in Third world countries. More than a billion people today are paid less than one hundred and fifty dollars a year, which is less than the average American earns in a week” (Microsoft Encarta). This causes the majority of poorly paid people to come to the United States of America in search of a better life. This leads to a question that is being discussed by the presidential candidates, and also many congressmen who are running for election in their states. Should America open its borders to attract more workers to our prosperous economy?
     More than 1 million people are entering the U.S. legally every year. From 1983 through 1992, 8.7 million people of these immigrants arrived on American soil, the highest of any decade since 1910. A record 1.8 million was granted permanent residence in 1991. Due to our present law in the United States, that stresses family unification, these arrivals can bring over their spouses, sons, and daughters; adding up to 3.5 million waiting in line to come to America. Latin America’s population is now 390 million (Censuses 1990). This number is projected to be over eight hundred million by the year 2005. Mexico’s population has tripled since World War II. One third of the population of Mexico is under 10 years of age. The effects of this, are, within ten years Mexico’s unemployment rate will increase over 30 percent. Reports show that in 1990, an estimated 4 million illegal aliens entered the United States, more that 50 percent of which were from Mexico. Our border control program allegedly arrests 300 illegal immigrants per day. For every one that we catch two immigrants escape into our country unnoticed.
     In the 2000 election immigration is one of many issues of each candidate. However, it is not one to ignore because it will affect our nation a great deal in the up and coming future. Presidential...

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