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Positive Changes In Character In "The Adventure Of Huckleberry Finn” By Mark Twain

2162 words - 9 pages

The novel “The Adventure of Huckleberry Finn”, by Mark Twain is an exciting book that describes the story of a young boy and his friend Jim. Huckleberry Finn, who is the protagonist in this tale, is a young boy who enjoys his immature life to the fullest. Playing pranks, going on adventures and running away from society are part of his daily thrill. At first sight it might seem that Huckleberry Finn might be an uneducated boy who has no interest or probability of growing mature. However, throughout the story the immature boy has plenty of encounters which strengthen his character and lead him from boy- to manhood.
Huckleberry Finn, the son of a known drunk in town, is already able to look back at some exciting adventures and a chaotic and disobedient lifestyle. As he was taken under the wings of the widow Douglas. He lived in her nice house with the intentions of making him an acceptable figure of the american society. After three months Huckeberry Finn cannot take, living a high social life, full of annoying expectations, that he eventually leaves the town St. Petersburg. On his way to freedom and away of authority he gets to know Jim. A colored slave who also escaped from his owner because he was about to be sold to a new plantation owner. They become friends and start to head down the Mississippi river on a self-made raft. On which they experience a bunch crazy adventures, sometimes even dramatic ones. While on their trip Huck basically only experiences fraud, theft and lies as he runs into his father and a clever couple of swindlers. He soon notices that justice, faith and humanity is only presented as a camouflage. At the end of their travels Huckleberry Finn and Jim meet Tom Sawyer and eventually return back to St. Petersburg. In the town Huck would again have the possibility of receiving a normal life and a bright future, but once more he decides not to stay. He wants to travel to the west, far far away from the newly experienced reality on his adventures. Huck is being presented as an all-knowing narrator, with corresponding commentary, but also as a naive boy who is going through a time of character strengthening and development in his life.
The novel, which was written by Mark Twain, soon showed to be one of the greatest american works in recent literary history. In the beginning of the writing phase of the book, it was at first solely seen as a continuance of Tom Sawyer, because the reader can tell that Huckleberry Finn has similar thinking styles as his Tom. But soon one will realize that Huck is a class by itself and showed himself as a strong character which can stand by himself and make the whole story of the novel worthwhile. The author includes in the novel things that have really happened his his live and the lives of some of his friends. Furthermore, Mark Twain grew up in a time period of slavery which build his character while growing up. Therefore Huckleberry Finn as a character in he novel cannon simply be seen as a...

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