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Possibilities: A New World Essay

1140 words - 5 pages

Whether England’s first settlers in the New World were escaping religious persecution or attempting to further their economic status, they endured hardships that tested their fortitude to the limits. The indigenous population, lack of supplies, and lack of manpower are just a few difficulties that England’s settlers faced on a continuous bases. So, how did they overcome the rigors of daily life? Sadly, many of them didn’t. Instead, the New World was full of back breaking work, famine, disease, and death. Nonetheless, it was under these very circumstances in which the foundation of England’s colonization efforts persisted into becoming a true powerhouse of its time.
England’s venture into colonization of the New World was not an immediate success. Instead, it was a series of failures, which caused England to rethink its position in terms of colonization of the New World. Interestingly, the three most notable failures came from two half-brothers. Both of whom served with a group of privateers’ known as The Sea Dogs, which used dynamic methods of colonizing Ireland. Nonetheless, the first settlers lacked the necessary tools required to accomplish such a hardship, and they were severely lacking the basic fundamentals of leadership it took to organize such an enterprise.
Moreover, The Sea Dogs were a group of privateers that were hired by England to help settle Ireland. The method they used to manage such a feat was to move into the lands they wished to conquer then push people from their homes. At this point they would claim the area in the name of England and have anyone who resisted killed. Lastly, a Lord would be appointed as governor of the land, and he would have full control over all who resided in the colony. This approach to colonization would later be referred to as The Irish Model, which would be used to deal with the indigenous people encountered in the New World.
Subsequently, Sir Humphrey Gilbert set out to establish England’s first colony in the New World. He was also determined to find a trade route to Asia, yet the attempts were unsuccessful. However, he did manage to set claim to Newfoundland in the name of England. Regrettably, his ambitions of a settlement at the location were never accomplished due to unforeseen circumstances.
In addition, much of Gilberts’ failure was due to his complete lack of leadership, and a crew that was un-prepared to handle the rigors of everyday life in the New World. Gilbert also lacked the ability to foresee the need for skilled tradesmen, women, or children that would be needed to establish a thriving community. Alternatively, he brought along an impoverished group of men that lacked the skills needed to carry out such a rigorous mission. Sadly, these shortcomings would be the cause of Gilberts’ demise on his return trip to England.
Likewise, Gilberts’ half-brother, Sir Walter Raleigh would also venture into colonization efforts on behalf of England, yet he would never set foot on a ship....

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