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Power And Corruption In George Orwell´S 1984

838 words - 4 pages

Nineteen Eighty-Four was written in the past yet seems to show very interesting parallels to some of today’s societies. Orwell explains many issues prominent throughout the book in which his main characters attempt to overcome. He shows how surveillance can easily corrupt those in control and how those in control become corrupt by the amount of power. Those with power control the society and overpower all those below. The novel shows what could potentially happen to our current society if power ends up leading to corruption.
In Oceana’s society, those who control the power are the one’s who control the past, present, and future. The society of nineteen eighty-four could be seen as an ...view middle of the document...

” INSERT CITATION HERE. The quote about censorship in North Korea shows much similarity to that of Oceana. In both societies, what is allowed to be viewed is widely monitored and all activity of citizens in highly watched, giving access to only that which is provided by those with power. This again, shows the idea of how the people with power control the society.
The leaders of a country or society are supposed to be there to help its people, however, in both Oceana and North Korea it seems to do just the opposite. In Oceana, the Inner Party controls the food and amount of food its citizens get. The Inner Party has access to many foods that the rest of the society has been restricted, it controls the amount by changing the rations whenever it feels may be appropriate and giving them only the bare minimum of food. In North Korea, the idea is just the same, but slightly worse. The leaders of North Korea are having difficulty providing food to its people and through its acts have proved to be corrupt in their decisions, “…North Korea though not accepting aid and destroying any of the food that is given to them should be unthinkable. This is dystopian just for that reason. The leaders of the country have at least some power to stop the starvation of millions but refuse it.” INSERT CITATION HERE. The people at the top control everything with the society and would do just anything to...

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