Presentation Of Susan Bordo "Reading The Slender Body"

1418 words - 6 pages

Issues of dieting, fat, and slenderness are hot topics in our culture. Bordo addresses them from a postmodern, but historical, feminist perspective. In this essay, she attempts to explain the appeal of slenderness in our society; and also, how the ideology of normal our society holds can be mentally and physically damaging for many people.So, what does it mean to be slender? The ideas behind slenderness have changed considerably throughout human existence. The Greeks believed that the regulation of food consumption would lead to self mastery and achieve moderation. Christians during the middle ages thought of fasting as a way to cleanse to spiritual body. Then around the end of the 19th century, people began to view the physical body as the enemy rather than the soul.Hoping to defeat the body, our culture has created a booming market of diets, cosmological surgery, and exercising equipment. The body management market feeds off the trends found in movies and music videos, on fashion runways, and in advertisements. With every new trend, comes a new body style. Remember the nineties when Kate Moss was on the runways. Her body had the shape of a 13 year old boy. No curves, no shape. Yet, she was in every magazine wearing Calvin Klein's clothes. What about now. Pink and her fit body with cuts in her muscles at her hips as we have been seeing men, like D'Angelo and Usher, sculpting. It may seem as though there is nothing wrong with wanting to achieve this idealized view of health found in our culture, but what happens when the pursuit goes wrong?Bordo begins by showing how flab became the enemy. As our culture changes, so does the idea of the perfect body. Thin is not the goal anymore. An athletic build, free of all bulges and lumps, is the desired body style of this day and age. During the 80's, people who suffered from excessive weight were the target of advertisers. Now, people of what our culture would consider normal proportions are "attacking" these bulges through liposuction and compulsive dieting and exercising. Bordo explains the desire for a "more contained body profile" as a way for controlling "uncontained desire, unrestrained hunger, [and] uncontrolled impulse." Bordo expresses our cultures view of the slender body as, "To be slim is not enough----the flesh must not 'wiggle.'" In saying this, she explains why the ideal body image is slowly becoming thinner and thinner as our culture progresses into the 21st century.Next she talks about how the view of one's body affects the inner self. Until to the late 19th century, the body represented one's social and economic status. The more plump, the more wealth and power. Then, the slender body began to symbolized power without the outward showing of wealth through the size of the belly. As material wealth began to take a back seat to the ability to control and manage, excess body weight began to symbolize a deficiency in will and morals.Muscularity became the embodiment of masculine...

Find Another Essay On Presentation Of Susan Bordo "Reading the Slender Body"

Reading between the Lines: Use of Space and Body Language in Caryl Churchill's 'Top Girls'

1798 words - 7 pages The question of how body-language and space are used in Caryl Churchill's `Top Girls' is interesting. A traditional view exists that a play is dictated by the text to the extent that the actors ought not to deviate from a pure reading. This theory emphasises authorial control and allows performers little opportunity to interpret the text for the audience. A competing view is that a play is a complete entity only when performed, aiming for a

The Life of Susan B. Anthony

756 words - 4 pages Susan B. Anthony has gone through many rough times and had to go through many obstacles. She has had many ideas to try and get women equal rights. Susan, I believe, is an amazing person to accomplish what she did. This is the reason she should be in the History Hall of Fame. Susan B. Anthony was born on February 15, 1820 (Bio.com). She studied at a Quaker school near Philadelphia and found work as a teacher (Bio.com). The article “Susan B

The Importance of Reading

1139 words - 5 pages The Importance of Reading “Why do you read all the time?” A frequently asked question of my past and I still find it repeated even now as I have entered a higher class of the educated. Whenever posed with this blatant criticism of my preferred free time activity, I simply answer with “Why don’t you read all the time?” Of course I might sound like the biggest geek that ever walked the face of the earth, but the fact of the matter is that no

Techniques of the Body

6056 words - 24 pages bed, these are very ordinary, everyday techniques that we take for granted and perceive as something natural, but often they are technique’s we have been taught to do. Marcel Mauss in his work Techniques of the Body (1934) is regarded as the first piece of work to outline a systematic anthropology of the body (Synnott 1993). It aims to show evidence that most everyday body techniques differ between people raised in different environments, as

The Radical Impact of Reading

1978 words - 8 pages As children, we begin to develop a firm understanding of grammar, spelling and phonetics; the “nuts and bolts” of language. Growing into comprehensive readers, we learn to assemble and dissemble the collection of words and symbols which make up sentences. After practicing alternative methods such as letter recognition and memorization, we eventually stop going through “only the motions of reading” and begin to understand the message behind the

Reading the Book of Stars

1143 words - 5 pages Reading the Book of Stars Herbert emphasizes the gratification that comes from reading, and the opportunity for self-discovery that is given to those who read the Bible within his sonnet “The Holy Scriptures II.” He captivates his audience with the use of celestial imagery in relation to Scripture and provides a personal example in order to establish his credibility. Yet in order to fully appreciate this poem one must take the time to

Reading The Book of Revelation

1378 words - 6 pages , however, and the distinctive imagery and symbolism used places what could be called prophecy into the genre of apocalyptic, which is the over riding generic feature of the work . Having now looked briefly at the structure, content and genre of the Book of Revelation, let us now survey the scientific/positivist readings of it and discuss some of its strengths and weaknesses. The scientific/positivist model of reading Revelation consists of

Close Reading of "The Panther"

1611 words - 7 pages The poem “The Panther” by Rainer Maria Rilke is written in the free verse form of poetry. As such, it is concerned with capturing images and delivering emotions (“Writing Free Verse"). The poet has chosen the length of each line purposefully, with the effect that a rhythm has been established despite the lack of rhyme. This rhythm has been created because the lines of the poem resemble the structural patterns of normal speech (“Writing Free

The theme of Susan Glaspell's "A Jury of Her Peers".

519 words - 2 pages FeminismThe theme of a story is expressed in many different ways. Things such as the title, characters, plot, and setting are all means in which a theme can be developed. In Susan Glaspell's "A Jury of Her Peers," she examines the theme of feminism by her use of the title, the characters and the plot.First, Glaspell uses the title to let the reader know that ultimately Minnie Wright's fate will be decided by a "jury of her peers." Minnie's

The Presentation of Love in Poetry

2686 words - 11 pages The Presentation of Love in Poetry Compare in detail the presentation of love (and loss) in How Do I Love Thee by Elizabeth Barrett Browning, First Love by John Clare and Remember by Christina Rossetti with further reference to My Last Duchess by Robert Browning, When We Two Parted by Lord Byron and A Woman To Her Lover by Christina Walsh The three poems, First Love by John Clare, Remember by Christina Rossetti

Methods of presentation influence the viewer's response.

842 words - 3 pages The methods of presentation influence the viewer's response to the people involved, events reported and the cultural beliefs of a certain topic, showing how the commercial broadcasting stations present reports manipulating the information given to influence the viewer on a certain viewpoint or opinion presented.There are many methods that influence a viewer's response such as the usage of technical and audio codes and the role of the reporter

Similar Essays

"The Story Of My Body" By Judith Ortiz Cofer, And "Never Just Pictures" By Susan Bordo.

1275 words - 5 pages school she went. All the problems mentioned by Judith Ortiz are caused by the influence of the media. Bordo who focuses in the way women are portrayed explains all these influences."Never Just Pictures" is the title of Susan Bordo's article on which the media is criticized of manipulating our ideals concerning a women body. The majority of contemporary women models are thin, tall, and pretty. Bordo states, "Eating disorders are also linked to the

Way Of Seeing, By John Berger And Susan Bordo’s Beauty (Re)Discover The Male Body

1224 words - 5 pages and actually question themselves.   Works Cited Berger, John. "Way of Seeing." Berger, John. Ways of Reading: An Anthology for Writers. Ed. David Bartholomae and Anthony Petrosky. Ninth Edition. Bedford/St.Martin, 2011. 141-160. Bordo, Susan. "Beauty (Re)discovers the male body." Bordo, Susan. Ways of Reading: An Anthology for Writers. Ed. David Bartholomae and Anthony Petrosky. Ninth Edition. Bedford/St.Martin's, 2011. 189-233.

The Case Of Susan Essay

1304 words - 5 pages the issue of the disability (Vance & Bridges, 2009). Like many students with invisible disabilities, such as learning disabilities, Susan is worried about how she will be perceived if she reveals her disability. Susan was academically successful in high school with the help of special instruction and accommodations such as extra time and modified lecture notes provided by her teachers. She was hoping that in college, she would be able to do it

"The Prime Of Miss Jean Brodie" By Muriel Spark And "The Girls Of Slender".

1457 words - 6 pages In the novels The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie and The Girls Of Slender Means the author Muriel Spark uses narrative structure as a means of control over her events. Her technique is manipulated in an expert fashion, and contributes to the depth and meaning of the book.Throughout The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie the author toys with the reader, changing their perceptions of who is truly the main character. At the beginning of the book we are led to