Presidential Debates Essay

2314 words - 9 pages

Presidential Debates

Presidential debates are becoming a large part of a campaign plan. ("Where the voters are") Who would think that such a short confrontation between the candidates would sway the vote of so many viewers? A presidential campaign could be won or lost from a single debate. The candidate must keep their cool and not go over the edge; they must be have a strong stand point on all of the topics, don't avoid anything. When debates first started they did not have this much effect on the voters, but now that a debate can be heard over the internet and through the television voters don't have to put forth any effort. All of the necessary points are usually covered in the debate. The points are not the only things that affect a voter, the appearance of the candidate, his tone of voice and his overall preciseness of his plans and ideas. Though the more modern debates can some what be planned, debates are still believed to be the best possible way to see the candidate in action and not just reading or saying what everyone wants to hear. The spin doctors, sponsors, television and media are playing a much larger part in presidential debates these days but all of this still shows what the importance of the debate is.
Spin Doctors
Spin doctors, isn't that a strange name in politics and especially a presidential debate. No it is not the singing group called the Spin Doctors. In large debates a campaign will put together what they call a "spin squad", this is a group of several spin doctors. These people are actually a very vital part of any presidential debate. All of the spin doctors today are very powerful in the government and also paid a small chunk of money for going out and preaching their parties' candidate's beliefs and plans. Spin doctors are the people whom are hired to perform the pre and post debate controversy among the media. The pre debate spin does not usually have any effect on the media. They are responsible for "accentuating the positive and eliminating the negative". (Spin doctors) Which means they are trying to take anything that was good in the debate for the campaign and basically feed it to the media. They keep doing this until they believe that the point, which is good, has been gotten across to the media and the media now better understands what was actually being said. Instead of themselves putting their own opinion of what happen down they put down what the spin doctors are telling them. When eliminating the negative the spin doctors are trying to convince the media that what was actually said came out to be a miss understanding and after that they continue pounding the positive points. The place that the spin doctors work can sometimes be on the platform after the debate but is usually held in a large room. This room is complete chaos, after the debate media member's rush to this place to be the first to interview the spin doctors. The spin doctors consider this place "Spin Alley", and say it is a frantic...

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