Presidential Nomination Process Essay

634 words - 3 pages

The American government is set up as a two party system. The United States uses a two party system, which means that there are two major political parties that dominate the voting in all elections (“Two-party system,” n.d.). Ultimately, the presidential candidate who receives the most votes in a state wins those electoral votes of the state. The two strongest political parties are the Democrats and Republicans. Although, the two party’s ultimate goal is to nominate a presidential candidate, they do not nominate their presidents in similar ways. Therefore, the presidential nomination process of the Democratic party is better than the nomination process of the Republican party.
The Democratic presidential nomination process has changed over time. The 1984 election led the Republican candidate, Ronald Reagan, to victory with 49 states, while the Democratic nominee, Walter Mondale, only won the electoral votes in two states. Due to the 1984 election, the Democrats were left “defeated and dispirited” (Valelly, 2010). The Democrats then figured out that the party reforms were controlled by the nomination process. The Democratic party was extremely weakened due to the few links that Democrats had in congress (Valelly, 2010). These changes caused the Democratic party to modify their presidential nomination process. By the 1992 election, the Democratic party had finally won a presidential candidate and William “Bill” Clinton was elected into office. The changes of their nomination process led to a successful election in 1992.
The Democratic party holds their presidential nomination process in a national convention to select delegates through a primary or a caucus (“Britannica School,” 2014). The Democrats usually divide their delegates proportionally and use superdelegates. By dividing their delegates proportionally, the Democrats require that a candidate must win at least fifteen percent popular vote (“Britannica School,” 2014). This process takes the Democrats a longer time to nominate their candidate, but it makes the nomination process equal and creates a...

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