Presidential Selection In The United States

1969 words - 8 pages

The process of presidential selection in the United States of America is very valuable. It is through this important procedure, that Americans are able to elect the candidate they believe is best suited for leading the most dominant nation of the world. Although the presidential selection process is highly esteemed, it is also very lengthy, expensive, and complex. The steps to the selection process have been altered quite a lot since the beginning, but the fundamental idea behind this system of voting remains constant and was created by the views of the Founding Fathers of our country.Our Founding Fathers had the responsibility to examine all the necessary information to make certain that the process of presidential selection they formulated satisfies all of their countries' citizens, as well as the citizens of the future. In Article II of the United States Constitution, they described in detail the presidency, from the steps in the process of selection to the necessary duties the elected President must fulfill as the leader of the nation.Of all the rules regarding the presidency, our Founding Fathers formulated, the crucial rules regarding the process of selection were the eligibility requirements and term limits. In Article II, they clearly stated regarding the eligibility:"No person except a natural-born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the Office of President; neither shall any Person be eligible to that of Office who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty-five years, and been fourteen Years a Resident within the United States."[1]In regards to the term limits, they stated in the twelfth amendment of the Constitution:"No person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twice, and no person who has held the office of President, or acted as President, for more than two years of a term to which some other person was elected President shall be elected to the office of the President more than once."[2]The process of presidential selection begins at least one year in advance of the general presidential election. Beginning in early January and through February, voters get their first chance to participate in the nomination process, in which they attend party caucuses and cast ballots in primaries to select the presidential nominees for the two main political parties.The key to the nomination campaign is winning delegates to the party's national conventions, which are held during the summer of the election year. One of the misconceptions regarding the presidential selection in the United States is that voters think that they vote directly for the presidential candidate of their preference, but this is in fact false, because voters actually select delegates, and it is the delegates that select the presidential candidates based on the expressed opinions of the mass people they represent.Delegates are selected state by state through primaries, in...

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