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Presidents Of The 1930s Essay

946 words - 4 pages

The 1930s were a very rough time for most people. These were hard times because of the Great Depression and the Stock Market crash. The Presidents of the 1930s were Herbert Hoover and Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Both of these Presidents came from different backgrounds and had the responsibility of trying to help people through the Great Depression. The two Presidents of the 1930s, Herbert Hoover and Franklin Roosevelt were faced with many problems during America’s Great Depression and had very different approaches at solving them. Franklin Roosevelt was favored by many and Hoover was looked down on by most of America’s people.
When the stock market crash of 1929 struck, the worst economic downturn in American history was upon Hoover’s administration. (Biography.com pag.1) At the beginning of the 1930s, more than 15 million Americans--fully one-quarter of all wage-earning workers--were unemployed. President Herbert Hoover did not do much to alleviate the crisis.(History n.pag.) In 1932, Americans elected a new president, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who pledged to use the power of the federal government to make Americans’ lives better.
Herbert Hoover was born on August 10, 1874, in West Branch, Iowa, and was the first president born west of the Mississippi River. (Biography.com pag.1) Herbert Hoover was the 31st president of the United States from 1929 to 1933. When the election of 1932 came around, Hoover blamed the depression on factors beyond his control, but the public either didn’t care or wasn’t buying it, and Franklin Roosevelt won the election. (Biography.com pag.2)
During the Great Depression President Herbert Hoover made a critical mistake in signing into law the Smoot-Hawley Act, which raised taxes on imports and prompted foreign nations to turn their backs on American-made goods when the country desperately needed sales. (Biography.com pag.1) This wasn’t good for anyone and made the Depression worse. Hoover watched helplessly while businesses closed their doors and Americans sank into poverty. (Biography.com pag.1) Life was very hard for the American people because the lack of jobs and thus lack of money. When the government failed to provide relief to the people, Herbert Hoover was blamed for the economical situation and people living in makeshift homes called “shantytowns” were renamed to “Hoovervilles”. The Depression worsened in the months preceding Roosevelt's inauguration on March 4, 1933. Factories were closing, farms were foreclosing, and bank failures increased, while unemployment soared. (fdrlibrary n.pag.) FDR took immediate action to start his New Deal programs. To halt deposits he closed the banks temporarily. He worked with a special session of Congress during the first "100 days" to pass recovery legislation which set up alphabet agencies such as the AAA (Agricultural Adjustment Administration) to support farm prices and the CCC (Civilian...

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