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Privacy After Sep 11, 2001 In Relation To George Orwell's Novel, 1984.

1113 words - 4 pages

After September 11th 2001, America was changed forever. Many Americans had felt violated and stripped of pride after terrorists hijacked an airplane and crashed it into an American landmark. Not only did the citizens of the United States feel threatened but so did the government, and to prevent themselves from further exploitation the U.S. government created the Patriot Act. The Patriot Act was the government's way of invading the privacy of Americans and immigrants, legally. The Patriot Act is supposed to prevent future terrorism by finding out about it before it happens. This is quite similar to the prevention of rebellion in the George Orwell novel, "1984." The telescreens in the novel represent the lack of privacy the people of Oceania had from their government as well. Even though 1984 was written nearly fifty years ago it still has a strange resemblance to today. 1984 was written at around the same time as Stalin and this just goes to prove that "History repeats itself."In 1984, the government used psychological manipulation to overpower the outer party into believing in their propaganda. The telescreens in the houses of Oceania watched down on them and heard their every movement. The citizens of Oceania were not even given a chance to have free-thought, because that would allow communism and rebellion to slip into their minds. Every aspect of their life was controlled and watched by the government. Winston worked at the Ministry of Defense and looked for ways to fight his oppressed privacy. Julia on the other hand wants to rebel but not so much as Winston. Julia just wants to live in the moment and do what she wants. The lack of privacy for Winston and Julia causes them to seek refuge in a far away place with no telescreens so they can find pleasure in the things of life that the Big Brother government does not want them to do.All governments have the right to prevent crime and revolt by those who may disagree with them. The Patriot Act was rushed into creation. There is a lot of evidence that the people who passed the law did not even read the law before signing it. The Patriot Act gives the government an immense amount of privileges with the privacy of other people. In 1984 the government had unlimited rights, if the law said they weren't allowed to do something that they did, they would change the law and tell everyone that what they did was always allowed. The United States government has a right to be monitoring suspicious behavior and flagging them for investigation. The United States does not have the right to read the medical files of people who have not raised any criminal flags.Privacy was not always as valued as it is once it is put at jeopardy. Before September 11th, personal privacy was not threatened as much as it is today. Fifty years ago a company was not able to find out your shopping history, yearly income, and the car you drive all from your phone number. The government is not the only one keeping tabs on people anymore;...

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