Pro Immigration In The United States

1332 words - 5 pages

One of our nation's biggest problems if you would call it a problem is Immigration. I am writing this to inform my readers or in this case reader why immigration should be legal. I have based my research on three things, economy, Social Security, and freedom of life. I hope this essay will help you see a different perspective of immigration and what it can do for our country.

Immigration has been going on in America since the seventeenth century when the English established settlements on Plymouth and Jamestown, which were originally the Native Americans. Notice where I?m going with this? No, ok, read on. Most of the Immigrants were European, until the passage of the Immigration Act was abolished in1965. Approximately one million Immigrants enter the US each year, and about 500,000 come in illegally. (Duignan). Lawmakers have attempted to revise immigration policies and crack down on illegal immigration in order to increase national security ever since 9/11. In 2007, President Bush decided that the best way to stop illegal immigration was to build a wall in-between the US, Mexico boarder. (Mankiller). 1798, a series of four laws passed by a Federalist-controlled Congress in anticipation of war with France during the administration of John Adams. Designed to restrict the pro-French and antiwar activities of the Jeffersonian Republicans, three of the laws dealt with alien foreigners and one with sedition criticism of government officials and policy. Under the Alien Enemies Act (never repealed but amended) the president was authorized to imprison or deport citizens of enemy nations. The Alien Friends Act never enforced and expired in 1800 permitted deportation of citizens of friendly nations. The Naturalization Act repealed in 1802 increased the residency requirement for citizenship from five to fourteen years. The Sedition Act expired in 1801 prohibited resistance to federal laws and criticism of the government. The Federalists designed the measures to expire at the end of Adams's term in 1801 and did not include Vice President Thomas Jefferson in the list of federal officials protected from criticism. Opposing the Alien and Sedition Acts as a violation of freedom, Jefferson and James Madison challenged their constitutionality in their Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions 1798. (Yanak).
Most people think that Immigrants take too much from the government that they are not respecting the U.S., however Immigrants aren't flocking to the United States to mooch off the government. According to studies, the 1996 welfare reform effort dramatically reduced the use of welfare by undocumented immigrant households, exactly as intended. And another important thing happened in 1996, the Internal Revenue Service began issuing identification numbers to enable illegal immigrants who don't have Social Security numbers to file taxes. (Dalmia). Since 1986, we have invested billions of dollars in fences, technology, and manpower along the border and have not...

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