Process Philosophy In American Society Essay

1005 words - 4 pages

Throughout history, man has been trying to explain man’s origin, purpose, and identity. By trying to figure out these difficult questions, many have come to the realization that either man is either theistic and believes there is a God and a supernatural presence or that man is atheistic believing that there is not God and rejects the supernatural. Because of this man can choose either of those world views. If they in fact choose the atheistic worldview they in turn will turn to another belief or set of values that reject the supernatural and replaces it with another aspect of life. One of those alternate philosophies would be process philosophy. Process philosophy is the belief that reality and life is not fixed or absolute meaning that everything within reality has the ability to change and progress as time continues on. Process philosophy has had a great effect on American society involving civil rights. Within the past century many changes have occurred including: voting and equal rights for blacks and women and rights for those who are homosexual. These rights are direct examples of process philosophy working to its fullest extent within American society.
Since process philosophy takes the stance of rejecting the supernatural. Because of this man has to look toward other means to identity himself. One of them is socialism which basically “absolutizing (if only inadvertently) of the social approach to man and life.” (Martin 204) This in turn means that man has to identify himself as someone not an individual in God’s image but instead at the most a “social animal” (Lecture Notes 4.1) Because of this stance there is no differentiation between each man since there is not individualism. Hence man begins to believe that since there in no difference between all men, an egalitarian system begins to emerge creating equality between all but not through a biblical worldview. (Martin 202)
This belief of all men being equal and have no differentiation has had large effects on American society. One of the prime examples of this are the civil rights movements during the 1950s and 1960s. During this time African Americans, other minorities and women were fighting for their right to equal citizenship, voting, and job opportunities. Since over time we can see a shift from absolutism to process theory, it would not be difficult to believe that the belief that not all men are equal (absolutism) has changed to all men should be equal (socialism.) According to Glenn Martin one of the major themes of the 19th century was “freedom” and this establishment has created the path to the next theme of “equality” which will lead to the socialism approach that has been seen in civil rights. One prime example is the implementation of the Fourteenth Amendment, the Civil Rights Amendment. This amendment states “All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they...

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