This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

"Psycho" By Alfred Hitchcock Essay

1455 words - 6 pages

The movie "Psycho" by Alfred Hitchcock proved to be the most suspense fueled, frightening movies of all time, however, not because of any bloody death scenes, but because of the multiple techniques used to present the movie itself as frightening. Techniques such as cinematography, lighting, sound and scripts increase the suspense of the film, which therefore increase the audience's fear of each and every detail of the film. "Psycho" relies solely on the audience feeling the pressure of the increasing suspense, which in turn makes them scared. This use of suspense takes the place of modern day "blood and guts" scenes, yet still manages to give the same terrifying effect. Alfred Hitchcock's knowledge of techniques, mixed with his unique approach to create the fear in the film, created one of histories most unique, frightening films ever.Norman Bates, the main character of the film, and whom the film is based upon, is portrayed as the man who is, quite plainly, psycho. This is described in multiple ways, all adding to the suspense of knowing Norman, and watching and understanding him. One of the techniques used to depict Norman is cinematography. When Norman was in any scene, or in an image, he is usually shown alone, describing him as a shady, "got something to hide" sort of person. Also, his scenes and images often include things which relate to him, and inturn make the audience think about the item being part of Norman. The house and/or motel, for instance, are both related to Bates, and because we know that they are empty and seemingly creepy, we relate this fear to Norman. The setting itself, a lonely area with the nearest civilization 15 km's away, makes the audience think of Norman as a creepy loner who assumes that "A boys best friend is his mother" . Another factor contributing to the films suspense and fear is the sound and music tracks. The music around Bates is usually either extremely quiet, which makes the audience fear the unknown of what might happen later, as sounds can provoke the idea beforehand. The sound track tends not to increase when around bates anyway, as his personality needs not music to develop the idea of psycho in the audiences head. The sound track for the film in general includes many violins, as these can decrease and increase sharply in sound pitches. The low tunes relate the audience's feelings toward being calm, while in sharp contrast, the high pitch tunes relate to major changes, or shocks. Both types of sounds, however, usually occurs on a character is generally alone, not in a big group of people. This is because when the character is alone, the audience feels the loneliness and the fear of what is behind every corner. One of the greatest techniques of the films horror scheme is the lighting. The lighting in the film includes the use of shadows (perception of what was seen) and contrast. When Marion is murdered, we could gain a clear indication of who did it, but because it was a dark shot of the shadowy...

Find Another Essay On "Psycho" by Alfred Hitchcock

Exploring How Alfred Hitchcock Manipulates The Audience In Psycho

2365 words - 9 pages Exploring How Alfred Hitchcock Manipulates The Audience In Psycho Alfred Joseph Hitchcock is thought to be, by most, the greatest film director of all time. He was born in Leytonstone, London on13 August 1899. He directed many great films such as The Lodger, The Birds, Sabotage, Notorious, Rear Window, and of course one of his greatest achievements ever, Psycho in 1960. He directed the first British sound film

"How does Alfred Hitchcock explore the duality of human nature in the film Psycho?"

1771 words - 7 pages I'd like to go back and try to pull myself out of it before it's too late for me too." This again emphasises the point that Marion is the good and natural side while Norman is the dark, evil and unnatural side.So by just looking at some of these key scenes in the film Psycho, we know that Alfred Hitchcock used many ways to explore the duality of human nature. He used lighting to bring some characters into "good light" and show the "goodness" in

An Analysis Of How Narrative And Genre Create Meaning And Response In The Sequence Starting With Marion Crane’s Arrival At ‘The Bates Motel’, Ending With Her Murder In The Shower In Psycho By Alfred...

1960 words - 8 pages future developments in horror. The eventual protagonist: Norman Bates, a character loosely based on the aforementioned Ed Gaines set up a stock character which is seen in an evolved form of some sort in all slashers since. It wasn't until 1978 when "˜Halloween' was released by John Carpenter. This was the first release, that used the blueprint created by "˜Psycho', to achieve the high success that slasher films now attain. It took the

Rear Window, by Alfred Hitchcock

634 words - 3 pages      In the movie, Rear Window, Alfred Hitchcock uses the story of a cripple free lance photographer, Jeff Jeffries, to explain the twisted sense of society in the 1950’s. Hitchcock uses clever things from the way the apartments are being filmed to the dialogue between Jeffries, Lisa, and Stella to show societies interest in pain, tragedy, and discomfort, and in the end you see how tragedy is what makes everyone happy.      From the very

A media analysis of the film 'Psycho' by Alfred Hitchcock. Looking specifically at voyeurism, third person narrative and the roles of both male and female characters

974 words - 4 pages From the moment when Marian pulls up in her car outside the motel, there isa tense atmosphere which is created by the bad weather and the fact that shearrived in the dark. Using this setting makes us (the audience) feel slightlyanxious even from the beginning, and also by using the second personcamera angles we are made to feel like voyeurs watching Marian and heractions. When we are wanted to focus on a specific person or object, thecamera

North by Northwest, by Alfred Hitchcock

1019 words - 4 pages Alfred Hitchcock’s film North by Northwest (1959) is famed as a classic man-on-the-run thriller, following protagonist Roger Thornhill as he flees across state lines in a mad dash to save his life and unravel the mystery to his extraordinary predicament. However, mid-way through the film Thornhill’s quandary is further complicated by the introduction of Eve Kendall, a beautiful yet mysterious woman he encounters on a train during his escape from

The Man Who Knew Too Much by Alfred Hitchcock

1013 words - 5 pages In this 1956 remake of the 1934 version of Alfred Hitchcock’s The Man Who Knew Too Much, Dr. Ben McKenna, played by James Stewart, and Josephine ‘Jo’ Conway, played by Doris Day, inadvertently get involved in an assassination plan after a mysterious Frenchman is murdered and their son is subsequently kidnapped. Hitchcock himself said, “Let’s say the first version was the work of a talented amateur and the second was made by a professional

Alfred Hitchcock's Specific Audience Reached by Psycho and The Birds

2646 words - 11 pages Alfred Hitchcock's Specific Audience Reached by Psycho and The Birds For this piece of coursework I am going to compare and contrast two Alfred Hitchcock Films in order to show how Hitchcock reached a specific target audience. The films, to which I will be referring are 'Psycho (1960)' and 'The Birds (1963)', I will illustrate the techniques, which the director (Alfred Hitchcock) used to appeal to specific audiences. In

Creation of suspense in "The Man Who Knew Too Much": directed by Alfred Hitchcock

1235 words - 5 pages Creation of suspense in "The Man Who Knew Too Much": directed by Alfred HitchcockAlfred Hitchcock is one of the most famous filmmakers of all times. His work and name will always remain know throughout all generation. Alfred Hitchcock is synonymous to fear, terror and mostly suspense. His outstanding cinematographic techniques and unique story telling ways are the main creators of this phenomenon, who is able to keep an audience in suspense

The Original Thriller Was Shadow of a Doubt Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

1564 words - 7 pages Shadow of a Doubt is a thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock that was released in 1943. The film is about a normal family, named the Newton’s, who live in Santa Rosa, California. They receive an unexpected telegram that their Uncle Charlie is coming to visit. The family is excited, especially Charlie Newton who is the older daughter in the Newton family and even named after her Uncle. Coincidentally, when Charlie went down to the post office

<About The Birds> It's about the movie <The Birds> by Alfred Hitchcock, a director who like to make scary movie

640 words - 3 pages doesn't believe it is a revenge. At last, a psycho man who holds a beer in the air shouts loudly,"It's the end of the world!" as a conclusion for this nonsense discussion.Then why, why Hitchcock created a terrible bird attack when a beautiful love story between Midge and Melanie just had begun. At first, it seems to be talking about the battle between humanity and the birds, until I found out there was no final battle between them, I realized

Similar Essays

Film: Psycho, By Alfred Hitchcock Essay

1384 words - 6 pages People have been looking behind their shower curtain when they enter the bathroom ever since Psycho swirled its way into movie theaters in 1960. This irrational fear of lurkers in the bath and scary psyches began with the first ever slasher film: Psycho by Alfred Hitchcock. Throughout the years, Psycho never lost its potency as the movie that created the horror genre as we know it. The low-budget “just for fun” film project that Hitchcock had

The Analysis Of The Film 'psycho' By Alfred Hitchcock

2302 words - 9 pages The Analysis of the Film 'Psycho' by Alfred Hitchcock Write a magazine article in which you discuss Psycho’s Enduring appeal as one of the great films of cinema. Discuss some specific techniques used by Hitchcock which create tension and suspense for the audience. With lower budgets, very basic special effects and black and white picture, Alfred Hitchcock’s psycho still manages to grind out the suspense to compete

Psycho And Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock

3658 words - 15 pages Psycho and Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock was born in the East London area of Leytonstone on August 13, 1899. He was the youngest son of William and Emma Whelan Hitchcock, the son of a poultry dealer and fruit importer. He was educated at the Jesuit School called St. Ignatius College in London. At the young age of 16 he left to study engineering and navigation at the University of London

Psycho By Alfred Hitchcock 1960 As Compared To The 1998 Version By Gus Van Sant

1847 words - 7 pages In 1960 Alfred Hitchcock created a film so daring and different it is still remembered even today. Other famous films of the time being "My Fair Lady" and "The Sound Of Music", although popular these films were idealistic and picturesque. Psycho brought in the first clips of violence and nudity into cinematography. To compare Alfred Hitchcock's version of psycho to Gus Van Sant's version in 1998 is beyond doubt a problematic deed when the