Psychoanalitic Approach To The Minister’s Black Veil

2504 words - 10 pages

   "All within hearing immediately turned about, and beheld the semblance of Mr. Hooper, pacing slowly his meditative way towards the meeting-house. With one accord they started, expressing more wonder than if some strange minister were coming to dust the cushions of Mr. Hooper’s pulpit·" Working in the realm of the Gothic, Nathaniel Hawthorne hits upon psychological points that few of his readers are willing to explore. Of course, one may not be able to relate to an example involving such an "eccentric" display as Mr. Hooper’s. There is a sudden hush throughout the audience, followed by a rush of low whispering. He walks past them, oblivious to the goings-on and proceeds to the front. Something has changed, and everyone is aware. It is painfully obvious that he wanted everyone to know, for the wounds of the change were self-inflicted· Putting the scenario this way helps to give an anonymous and general view to the former example. This method is used to show how realistic, even common, this somewhat absurd event may actually be. In a psychological analysis, this is a necessary element in both de-personalizing a situation and giving it potential for universal application. In Hawthorne’s "The Minister’s Black Veil," many interpretations by way of psychological analysis are possible, and, once exposed, quite apparent. Once revealed, there are many routes for understanding the story in a psychoanalytical context. The main approaches this essay will take involve a "Jungian" analysis, that is, one involving the use of some of the theories and conclusions of German psychoanalyst and pioneer, Carl Gustav Jung, a former student and friend of Sigmund Freud, in interpreting the actions of the characters in the story. Jung’s discord with Freud came when he realized that Freud’s theories involved too many concrete "solutions" to ambiguous problems. Jung began to assert the importance of myth, including findings that myths from around the world seemed to have certain common elements although completely isolated and uninfluenced by one another. Seeing that these similarities were in large number Jung began to apply them to his theories. The more popular of the theories include the concept of the archetype, the anima and the animus. The theory that best suits the style of Hawthorne’s Gothic is that of conflict, both internal and external. Jung’s approach to conflict involved the many internal conflicts between the conscious and unconscious parts of the mind. Jung saw these similarities often led to similarities in the psychologies of the different cultures. The conflict between the conscious and the unconscious is a basic premise of this realm of thought. Jung supposed that the unconscious was always "yearning" to become a part of the conscious mind. Assuming this is true, repressed memories, thoughts or tendencies are always trying to surface into the conscious mind. This is what Jung proposed was the main element in the conflict between the conscious and the...

Find Another Essay On Psychoanalitic Approach to The Minister’s Black Veil

The Minister’s Black Veil by Nathaniel Hawthorne

1762 words - 8 pages Witchcraft and a Black Veil The setting of “The Minister’s Black Veil” by Nathaniel Hawthorne occurs in Milford, Massachusetts which is less than 60 miles from Salem, a small town famous for putting hundreds of people on trial and sentencing several to death as a result of accusing them of witchcraft. The thematic historical similarities between the Salem Witch Trials and Hawthorne’s “The Minister’s Black Veil” is apparent through the use of

The Minister’s Black Veil– External, Internal Conflict

2818 words - 11 pages “The Minister’s Black Veil”– External, Internal Conflict                Based on the evaluations of literary critics, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short story, “The Minister’s Black Veil,” contains both an external and an internal conflict, about equally treated in the tale. It is the intent of this essay to explore both types of conflict as presented in the story.   R. W. B. Lewis in “The Return into Rime: Hawthorne” implies internal

The Minister’s Black Veil - Conflict, Climax and Resolution

2992 words - 12 pages “The Minister’s Black Veil” - Conflict, Climax and Resolution              Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “The Minister’s Black Veil” will be examined in order to determine the conflicts in the tale, the climax and resolution.   The conflict involving evil and sin, pride and humility is the direction that Clarice Swisher in “Nathaniel Hawthorne: a Biography” tends: “Hawthorne himself was preoccupied with the problems of evil, the nature of

External, Internal Conflict of The Minister’s Black Veil

2961 words - 12 pages External, Internal Conflict of “The Minister’s Black Veil”                Hugo McPherson in “Hawthorne’s Use of Mythology” comments on the “reason and passion” conflict which he sees in this writer: “Those who read him as a Christian moralist recognize instantly an opposition between Head and Heart, reason and passion which is related not only to Puritan theology but to the Neo-Classical view of man….” (69). Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short

The Whiteness of the Veil: Color and the veil in Hawthorne’s The Minister’s Black Veil and The Blithedale Romance

2045 words - 9 pages In his essay “Color, Light and Shadow in Hawthorne’s Fiction” Walter Blair approaches an interpretation of Hawthorne’s work through the author’s manipulation of color and light to produce symbolic meaning. Blair addresses “The Minister’s Black Veil” and notes the repeated emphasis on the blackness of Father Hooper’s veil and the pallor as a reaction to it. “The design of this tale,” he asserts, “is one in which repeated patterns of light, then

Minister's Black Veil - Poverty in Minister’s Black Veil and in Hawthorne’s Life

1483 words - 6 pages Poverty in “The Minister’s Black Veil” and in Hawthorne’s Life                 How many readers have considered that the utter simplicity within the Nathaniel Hawthorne short story, “The Minister’s Black Veil,” might be an expression or reflection of the utter poverty within the life of Hawthorne? It is the purpose of this essay to clarify this issue.   Hawthorne’s impoverishment probably began with the untimely death of his

Comparing and Contrasting the Protagonists in Flannery O’Connor’s Good Country People and Hawthorne's The Minister’s Black Veil

1819 words - 7 pages In the Flannery O’Connor’s “Good Country People,” Joy/Hulga Hopewell is the main protagonist. In “The Minister’s Black Veil,” written by Nathaniel Hawthorne the protagonist is Minister Hooper. Both of the main characters represent different views on religion, humanity, and humility. Hulga does not really believe in anything. Her main focus is trying to be smarter than others to compensate for her medical problems. Minister Hooper is a very good

The Ministers Black Veil

805 words - 4 pages Nathaniel Hawthorne’s (1804-1864) “The Minister’s Black Veil” (1836), shows that a person’s harmless intentions can cause so much chaos to others. This short story is a parable with secrets, dark areas, and symbols. This story is mainly about Mr. Hooper who is the Reverend of the little town Milford. Reverend Hooper shows up to church one day with a mysterious black veil over his face, making quite a problem. "Even forgetting the Omniscient

The Minister's Black Veil

1122 words - 4 pages Parson wears the crepe, questioning his purity and straying away from his person. When the Parson's intended, Elizabeth, asks him to do away with his foolishness and remove the veil, he sadly refuses, and Elizabeth reluctantly leaves him. The story concludes as the Parson dies, isolated by his choice to wear the veil with only the dying and the dead taking comfort in his presence, proclaiming that on each face he sees a black veil. In "The

The Minister’s Black Veil:A representation of an Inherent Sinful Nature

1377 words - 6 pages of their sinful nature. Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote a magnificent literacy work. The Minister’s Black Veil, one of his well-known stories of all time. In the story, Hawthorne illustrates and criticizes certain behaviors of the Puritans in their fixation on judging others and attempting to live a clean life free of sin. There are some key elements of Puritan theology that are relevant to the characters, which Hawthorne demonstrates throughout the

Alienation in The Minister's Black Veil

678 words - 3 pages Alienation in The Minister's Black Veil "The Minister's Black Veil" by Nathaniel Hawthorne is a story about one clergyman's alienation due to his outward dressing. Reverend Hooper was a well-respected preacher who got along well with the townspeople until one day when he appeared wearing a black veil over his face that consisted "of two folds of crape, which entirely concealed his features, except the mouth and chin" (Hawthorne 253). From

Similar Essays

The Minister’s Black Veil Essay

610 words - 2 pages The Minister’s Black Veil The story “The Minister’s Black Veil” is symbolic of the hidden sins that we hide and separate ourselves from the ones we love most. In wearing the veil Hooper presents the isolation that everybody experiences when they are chained down by their own sins. He has realized that everybody symbolically can be found in the shadow of their own veil. By Hooper wearing this shroud across his face is only showing the

The Minister’s Black Veil Characterization

2681 words - 11 pages “The Minister’s Black Veil” - Characterization                 This essay will demonstrate the types of characters present in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “The Minister’s Black Veil,” whether static or dynamic, whether flat or round, and whether portrayed through showing or telling.   R. W. B. Lewis in “The Return into Rime: Hawthorne” states: “… there is always more to the world in which Hawthorne’s characters move than any one of them

The Theme In The Minister’s Black Veil

2693 words - 11 pages The Theme in “The Minister’s Black Veil”                  Morse Peckham in “The Development of Hawthorne’s Romanticism” explains what he interprets Hawthorne’s main theme to be in his short stories:   This technique, though Hawthorne’s is different from that of European writers, creates analogies between self and not-self, between personality and the worlds. . . .Henceforth Hawthorne’s theme is the redemption of the self through

The Minister’s Black Veil By Nathaniel Hwathorne

1130 words - 5 pages Nathaniel Hawthorne, a well-known American novelist in the Romantic era, wrote and published the short story, “The Minister’s Black Veil,” in 1836. The story provides an intriguing case of the moral and psychological facet of a religious man and his community during New England and Puritan Age. The tale begins with the villagers gathering on the front porch of the Milford meeting-house to wait for Reverend Hooper. Parson Hooper arrives, and to